How to cook perfect rice
in an electric pressure cooker

The question we get asked more than any other is: “How do you make perfect rice in an Instant Pot?”

Cooking rice can be tricky. A lot depends on personal and cultural preferences, and even if we could all agree on the “perfect rice,” the altitude of your location, the hardness of your water, and the age and dryness of the rice all play a role in the results you get.

So how do you make perfect rice? The quick answer is: measure a 1:1 ratio of water-to-rice, rinse your rice before adding it to the Instant Pot, then set it and forget it!

The Instant Pot Rice Program

If you’re using the ever-popular parboiled, or long grain white rice, the handy “Rice” Smart Program was made precisely you. This setting automatically adjusts the time based on the volume of rice you add to the inner pot, so it truly is a one-button operation.

Manual Pressure Cooking

If you’re using a different kind of rice, select the “Pressure Cook” Smart Program (called “Manual” in some models). You’ll need to adjust the cook time depending on the grain:

  • Basmati (white) rice: 4-8 minutes
  • Jasmine rice: 3-5 minutes
  • Brown rice (long/short): 22-28 minutes
  • Wild rice mix: 25-30 minutes

Instant Pot 1:1 Perfect Rice Recipe

If you want to know why this recipe works, keep reading. If you just want to get cooking, here’s the 1:1 recipe up front:

  1. Measure out dry rice, set aside. We recommend using directly in the inner pot. (For smaller amounts, use the pot-in-pot method.)
  2. Measure out the same amount of water, then add it to Instant Pot’s inner pot.
  3. Rinse the rice, then add the wet rice to the water in the inner pot. Never fill your inner pot past the half-way mark when cooking rice.
  4. Place the inner pot into the cooker base, then plug in your Instant Pot.
  5. Close the lid, and set the steam release to the “Seal” position.
  6. Select your pressure cooking time.
    • The “Rice” Smart Program automatically sets the time for white or parboiled rice only.
    • For other types of rice, use the “Manual” or “Pressure Cook” Smart Program on High and use + and – to set the correct time depending on your preferences and any local issues, like high elevation or a large amount of rice.
    • Turn “Keep Warm” off.
  7. Do a natural release (NR) to release pressure from your cooker.
  8. When the float valve has dropped, open your Instant Pot, then fluff, serve and enjoy your perfect rice.

This approach combines thorough in-house research and testing with the anecdotal experience of hundreds of home cooks who’ve perfected making perfect rice in their Instant Pots. Of course, it’s just a starting point to work from. Everyone’s tastes are different! You may find that you want to adjust the 1:1 recipe in order to make the perfect rice for you.

Why does this work?

The reason why the 1:1 ratio works is that no matter what kind of rice you’re using, they all need to absorb the same amount of water while they cook. Conveniently, every kind of rice needs to absorb its own volume in water, giving us the very easy-to-remember 1:1 ratio.

Are you sure you don’t you need more water?

You’re probably used to using a lot more water when you cook rice, but using regular pots or rice cookers lets out a ton of steam. Because the Instant Pot is a sealed pressure cooker, very little water is lost to evaporation, so you can use a lot less.

Most people find that the 1:1 ratio produces the perfect result, but if you like your rice a little softer, you can add a little more than the recommended 1 cup of water per cup of dry rice.

To ensure that the rice cooks evenly, it is not recommended to use less than 1 cup of water per cup of rice.

Do I have to rinse the rice first?

For this recipe, yes. Rinsing rice not only removes some starch, but it also adds a little extra water to compensate for the small amount that is lost to evaporation. If you choose not to rinse your rise, measure out a few extra tablespoons of water.

Exactly how long do I cook the rice?

While the exact amount of water you use depends on how you like your rice, the exact length of time you cook your rice depends upon your specific conditions. For example, altitude can make a big difference. If you are cooking a large amount of rice, you may need to add a few extra minutes to the cooking time. That’s why we provide a range of times for different varieties of rice.

The goal is to stop cooking when all the water has been absorbed by the rice. If you open the cooker, give it a stir, and find there’s still unabsorbed water in the inner pot, then you’ll need to cook it a bit longer.

Do I have to use Natural Release of the pressure?

Yes, you do.

Waiting for the pressure to drop naturally avoids the problem of rice sticking to the bottom of the inner pot.

If you are in a hurry, we recommend using Natural Release for 10 minutes before releasing the rest of the pressure using Quick Release. Just don’t touch the steam release until at least 10 minutes have passed. Not if you want perfect rice, anyway.

Help, my rice is sticking to the bottom!

Did you do a Quick Release? You have to let the pressure go down with Natural Release or the rice may stick to your inner pot.

Also, make sure “Keep Warm” is off. The heat from “Keep Warm” may continue to cook the rice and make it stick to the bottom if it sits for too long.

How much rice can I cook?

We recommend a minimum of 1 cup of dry rice directly in the inner pot. If you’re cooking less, use the pot-in-pot method.

You can use the 1:1 recipe for any amount, but remember to never fill your inner pot past the halfway mark when cooking food that expands, such as rice.

If you are cooking a lot of rice, you may find you need to add a minute or two to the cooking time.

Do I have to use water?

Yes and no. The ratio calls for 1:1 water-to-rice, and while rice requires a water-based liquid to cook properly, you can absolutely play around with flavor by using different liquids in place of plain water.

Substitute some or all of the water you use for another liquid, such as chicken, beef, or vegetable stock. You can even try mixing half coconut milk and half water (using all coconut milk may give imperfect results).

For an extra dose of yummy, try stirring in a little bit of lime juice, mirin, soy sauce, chopped cilantro or green onions, or other flavor boosters just before you serve.

Do you need to add salt or butter?

You don’t need to, but you sure can add salt or butter if you want. A lot of people like a pinch or two of salt or a tablespoon or two of butter added before cooking. It all depends on your specific tastes.

How did you figure this out?

We do a lot of testing on our Smart Programs and recipes, and because rice is so popular and fundamental to the Instant Pot experience, well, we made rice—a lot of rice. More rice than anyone should ever have to make in their lifetime. We can safely say that we’ve experimented with rice more than anything else, and the proof is in the (rice) pudding!

Of course, we’re not the first. Not even close. People from countless cultures around the world have been cooking rice for thousands of years, and myriad “tried-and-true” techniques have been developed over time. The rice cooker has long been a popular appliance, designed to do one thing and one thing only: make rice. These rice cookers are just one of the many appliances the Instant Pot replaces, and many are finding that the Instant Pot does a better job!

One Instant Pot enthusiast, Deborah K., wrote to us to share her success using the Instant Pot to cook traditional Japanese rice:

“The ratio of Rice to Water is 1:1.25 (same as brown rice). I rinsed rice; used rice button on Instant Pot; 10-minute natural pressure release. The rice was perfect – even better than when I use our Japanese electric rice cooker (and verified by my Japanese-born family members who did not realize that my “best rice ever” was cooked in your pressure cooker).”

Another Instant Pot user reported awesome results with the same ratio when cooking brown rice:

“I cook brown rice for 22 minutes – 1 cups of rice with 1 1/4 cups of water – and that was pretty much the most perfect rice I’ve ever cooked”

These home cooks found that for cooking 1 cup of rice, 1.25 cups of water gave them great results, but what if you want to cook more rice at one time?

Jill Nussinow, The Veggie Queen, advocated a “sliding-scale” of water to rice in her popular pressure cooking cookbook, “The New Fast Food”. She revealed in our Instant Pot® Community Facebook group how she first came up with this:

“My job was to acquire recipes to use, as well as helping direct the writing of the programs to get the software that would adjust for number of servings to work correctly. This is where the algorithms came in. I learned a lot and have passed it on to many people.”

Cook’s Illustrated produced a video about why traditional methods of making rice in an ordinary pot call for different ratios of water to rice. The reason is evaporation. Old methods of cooking let a lot of water escape as steam, and the longer it took to cook the more water evaporated, so the more water you had to add at the start.

Remember that the Instant Pot is a sealed environment with very little evaporation. All the water you add is absorbed by the rice, so it doesn’t matter how long it takes to cook, the amount of water needed is the same: one cup of water per cup of rice. It doesn’t even matter what kind of rice it is, because all rice absorbs its own volume of liquid when cooking.

After discussing this approach with Flo Lum, a favorite Instant Pot video creator, she observed: 

“This is probably why the ‘Chinese’ methods actually makes sense now. There are two methods… One uses your full hand: when placed barely on top of the rice, the water should reach a certain point on the top of your hand. And the knuckle method: where you stick your middle finger tip into the water, barely touching the top of the rice, the water should reach the first knuckle. I never understood how it worked but now sort of makes sense. Ancient Chinese secrets.”

That is why the ideal water-to-rice ratio in the sealed environment of the Instant Pot is 1:1, using rinsed (wet) rice of any kind. After rigorous testing, it has been confirmed here in our test kitchen, as well as in millions of Instant Pot homes around the world.

It’s official: 1:1 ratio of water makes perfect rice

Reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. Nobody complains about mushy rice anymore, although some do find that the 1:1 method produced rice that is too “al dente” for their preferences; these people found that simple adding a bit more water fixed that.

So the next time you make rice in your Instant Pot, consider the 1:1 ratio of rice to water for your starting point. If it’s not quite right, try adding a little more water until you find the sweet spot that makes your perfect rice, every time.

What now?

Now that you know how to make perfect rice, how about trying out some other Instant Pot recipes to go with it?

There are hundreds more recipes available for free online in the Instant Pot Recipe Collection, or get them instantly on your mobile device by downloading the Instant Pot App.

Want more?

We hope you found this information helpful. To get more tips like this and new recipes delivered to your inbox every week, please sign up for the Instant Pot newsletter.

315 replies
  1. Melissa
    Melissa says:

    I was really concerned about making rice in the instant pot. I was afraid it would turn out mushy. I read this entire article and followed the directions to a T. It came out perfectly, and as promised, did not burn or stick to the bottom of the pot! This is how I will be making rice from now on. Thank you!

    Reply
  2. Barbara
    Barbara says:

    I have to agree with using the Pot-in-Pot method for cooking small quantities of rice. I’ve cooked my rice using PiP a couple of times. Also, if you cook your rice in a storage container (e.g., an open oven-proof bowl), then you have fewer dishes to wash.

    Reply
  3. Marie
    Marie says:

    I cooked some jasmine rice using the 1:1 ratio. The flavor and texture were decent but 1 cup of dry rice made only 2 cups cooked even though the bag says it should make 3 cups. Why is this?

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Marie,

      Typically rice doubles in size, so one cup of rice will make two cups of cooked rice. That is the same for both stove top and the Instant Pot Pressure Cooker. The stove top instructions will instruct to use 2 cups of water to 1 cup of rice because water evaporates while cooking.

      Reply
      • Marie
        Marie says:

        If rice typically doubles in size, why do most bags of rice say the yield is 3c for 1c dry rice. The same rice from the same bag yields 3 cups in my rice cooker, but only 2 cups in the Instant Pot. I’ve been experimenting and a group of us IP users would like to know why this is and if there’s anyway to get more volume in an IP.

        Reply
        • Instant Pot
          Instant Pot says:

          It is most likely due to the rice being able to expand / breakdown more without pressure.

          With pressure, the rice doesn’t expand as much and holds on to its structure better.

          Reply
  4. Jerry Kennedy
    Jerry Kennedy says:

    I’m hoping you can help as I’ve been attempting (and so far failing) to replicate my stove top Mexican rice recipe in my IP Ultra. The recipe calls for the rice to be toasted in olive oil (with chopped onions and garlic) prior to adding the boiling water. It also calls for the addition of tomato sauce, cumin, black pepper, and chili powder to the mix. The problem I run into every time is the dreaded “burn” alarm. Sometimes if I let it sit, it will start up again after a few minutes; other times it will error out altogether. I finally went back to using the stove top because it was taking an hour or longer to make sub par rice. I’d really like to figure this out, though. So here are my questions:
    1) Does toasting the rice affect the amount of water required, or is it still 1:1?
    2) I have tried rinsing the rice prior to toasting, and it makes an absolute mess of things. The rice ends up sticking together in clumps and is impossible to work with. If toasting, does the rice still need to be rinsed? If so, should I rinse it after toasting?
    3) Does the addition of aromatics and spices change the 1:1 ratio?
    4) Your instructions call for adding the water to the pot first, then the rice. I’m assuming the tomato sauce should be added to the top and not stirred in. Does this mean I should use a separate pan to toast the rice and aromatics on the stove top, then add that mix to the water in the pot and tomato sauce on top? Or is there a way to use the saute function in the IP to toast the rice and aromatics?
    I really appreciate any advice/help/experience anyone can offer, as this is the one thing about the IP that drives me absolutely bonkers.
    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Jerry,

      The issue may be due to the tomato sauce; especially if it is tomato paste.

      Toasting is fine and adding aromatics and doesn’t change the amount of water needed. That is a similar technique used in risotto, which is fantastic in the Instant Pot.

      Your suggestion to adding the tomato sauce/paste on top of the rice is recommended with tomato dishes. By putting it in layers make sure the thinner liquid is at the bottom then layer the thicker liquid on top.

      Here is what we recommend:
      1) Using saute, toast rice with the onions and aromatics.
      2) Using the required amount of water(or broth) deglaze the inner pot to ensure nothing was stuck to inner pot (one of the causes of the burn notice, browned bits after sauteing)
      3) Add the tomato sauce on top. You can also save a bit of the water or broth to add to the tomato sauce and pour it over. This will thin out the tomato sauce,and you can cover all the rice and not just one spot.
      4)Do not mix
      5)Cook on low for a longer time
      6) If it still fails, it may be too thick for the Instant Pot. You can still make it but it will have to be done using the Pot-In-Pot method.

      Reply
  5. Susanna
    Susanna says:

    I made rice for the first time last night. I am confused about the rice function vs. manual pressure cooking. I was cooking white rice. The rice function set it for 28 minutes, which seems far too long given that above you recommend 3 to 8 minutes for white rice. Why the inconsistency? (I chose manual and cooked for 5 minutes, at which point the rice was seriously underdone.)

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      The rice program and is fully automatic based on the amount of rice in the inner pot, it is also cooking at low pressure which adds to the longer cooking time.
      The time variation for the Manual program at High-Pressure is because it cooks differently. It is also important to allow natural pressure release for 10 minutes as it still cooks while under pressure.

      Undercooked rice can also be due to not enough water. Please use a water ratio of 1:1.

      Reply
      • J K
        J K says:

        1:1 ratio for me was undercooked, crunchy. So that ratio is not for everyone, everywhere. I cooked Comet white rice followed the instructions. Next time I’m trying 1 cup rice to 1.5 water. Hopefully it will work.

        Reply
        • Instant Pot
          Instant Pot says:

          Hi J K,

          The 1:1 ratio works with rinsed rice. If you prefer a more softer rice, you would increase the amount of water up to 1.5 cups.

          Reply
  6. Catherine Proulx
    Catherine Proulx says:

    in the cookbook that comes with the Instant Pot, on page 17, the cooking time for brown rice is 4 mins. I am guessing this is a typo…. the copy from the basmati rice (top of page) was used for the brown rice.

    Reply
  7. Jo Ann
    Jo Ann says:

    Can I use chicken broth in cooking rice in the Instant Pot, or must it be water? If chicken broth is okay, do the proportions or the recipe change?

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Jo Ann,

      Absolutely, you can add any water like liquid. If the liquid is water-based in order to generate steam to pressurize your cooker. Suitable liquids include water, broth/stock, fruit/vegetable juice, beer/wine (low alcohol content), and water-based cooking sauces.

      Please note if the broth is homemade it may be thicker than the typical store bought due to the gelatin and more may be needed.

      Reply
  8. Mindy
    Mindy says:

    Once the rice has finished cooking, how long can I leave it on the warm setting? My family often eats at different times over the course of a few hours, and I would love to have fresh, hot rice ready for everyone’s meal time!

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Mindy,

      The automatic keep warm setting turns off after 10 hours. You can leave it on automatic keep warm after cooking, but over time, the rice’s texture may change.

      Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Cris,

      If you are using white or parboiled rice you can use the rice button which sets the time automatically.

      If using the Manual or Pressure Cook button, the suggested cooking time is 3-8 minutes with 10 minute natural pressure release. You do not need adjust the cooing time if you increase the amount of food, though, it will take longer to come to pressure.

      Reply
      • Shannan
        Shannan says:

        I used an instant pot cookbook which directed 1 c rice with 1.5 c water. No other instruction on low or high pressure to use, with low, normal, or high setting. I think the manual needs more info. Until reading this, I was clueless. I did have a burn warning and undercooked rice; used a brown basmati. There was no indication for type of rice. Also, do I have to use the provided measuring cup for dry and liquids?

        Reply
        • Instant Pot
          Instant Pot says:

          Hi Shannon,

          Our current included recipe booklet suggests a ratio of 1 cup of white rice to 1 – 1.5 cups of water. The amount of water you use will determine the finished texture 1 cup of water will cook rice with a firmer texture up to 1.5 cups of water which will be soft texture.

          Depending on the grain used, the cooking time and water ratio can differ, our cooking timetable provides different cooking times and water ratios for popular grains.
          https://instantpot.com/instantpot-cooking-time/
          Brown basmati has a cooking time of 22 minutes. This could have been the reason for the undercooked rice. Please note, if you are cooking less than 1.5 cups of rice, use pot in pot method because the amount is too close the minimal amount of water needed and can cause pressurizing issues.

          The measuring cup include is a rice cup, you can use any other cup, by using equal amounts of rice to water.

          If a recipe doesn’t call for a pressure level, use high pressure always. If a recipe doesn’t state using “low”, “Normal” or “High” setting use “Normal”.

          The best resource for more information is our Facebook Community, we have over 1.6 million users willing to answer questions along with our moderators.
          https://www.facebook.com/groups/InstantPotCommunity/

          Reply
  9. Jenna Anders
    Jenna Anders says:

    Should I use the rice button for (white) sushi rice? I need to make 5 cups for a large group. So I understand I do 5 cups of washed sushi rice and 5 cups of water. Then push the rice button. I don’t need to set a specific time when I push the rice button-it automatically calculates it? About how long would 5 cups take to cook?

    Reply
  10. Caroline Meadow
    Caroline Meadow says:

    I followed this recipe, used 1 cup washed wet white rice and 1 cup water, and the IP gave a burn notice and when I opened it all the rice was stuck to the bottom but not burned. What happened?

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Caroline,

      The minimum amount of water is 1.5 cups for a 6-quart model. That most likely was the reason you were not able to make 1 cup of rice, as there was only a cup of water.

      When trying to make a small quantity of rice try the pot in pot method. Using an oven safe dish (that fits comfortably in the Instant Pots inner pot), prep your rice with water. Put 1.5 cups of water in the inner pot and place in the trivet/steam rack. Lower the oven safe dish into the inner pot on top of the steam rack and cook as normal.

      Reply
      • Kathleen Broadstreet
        Kathleen Broadstreet says:

        I tried the pot in the pot method described. With a 1:1 ratio of water and wet rice. Used the Rice setting. My rice came out well under cooked. I added a 1/2 option of water to the rice and am pressure cooking it for an additional 5 minutes on high pressure. Came out cooked but very sticky

        Reply
        • Instant Pot
          Instant Pot says:

          Hi Kathleen,

          When using the pot-in-pot method use the manual or pressure cook program because rice is automatic and the weight of the bowl interferes with the program. This may seem obvious, but did you add water to the inner pot as well as the pot-in-pot?

          Few tips, usually for dry foods if it was a little hard, it may have been the water amount. Based off preference some people like to use 1 – 1.25 cups of water to rice. The more water added the softer the texture.

          When doing pot-in-pot another trick is increasing the cooking time by a minute or two because the bowl will need to heat up which adds time compared to cooking directly in the inner pot, where the cooking vessel heats up during preheating.

          If you ever have to add time to pressure cooking, if it is undercooked, increase a couple minutes for non-meats because of it will still cook while pressurizing.

          Reply
      • Laura
        Laura says:

        I’m a IP newbie and while I have not yet tried cooking rice, I feel I should side with Caroline. The above recipe (method) for cooking white rice does say 1 cup water; 1 cup rice. No mention of 1.5 C being the minimum.

        However, my thought would be maybe a sealing problem. The 2nd time I used mine, I loaded it up/turned it on and left the kitchen. I came back 20 minutes later and freaked out because there was steam escaping from tall around the lid. I was barely able to rescue my dinner before it burned up. I removed and reinserted the ring and started over; and, all was well.

        Reply
        • Instant Pot
          Instant Pot says:

          Hi Laura,

          In the manual, it states the minimum required amount of water depending on the model’s size. One cup of rice only needs one cup of water which falls below some sizes minimum.

          You are correct and could have been the case, a misaligned sealing ring is one of the main culprits when experiencing pressure issues.

          Reply
    • Jniel
      Jniel says:

      I bet the seal was not properly seated in the lid. It’s happened to me. No seal, and all the water boiled out. Make sure next time the seal is good and that after starting cooking the silver pressure float rises and pressure is developed.

      Reply
  11. Koteswar
    Koteswar says:

    my instant pot is taking so much time to cook.it is just White rice. two cups of rice and required water and it is taking 45 minutes on an average, where as your website says 3 to 8 minutes.

    it is taking almost 30 minutes for pre heating. this is crazy.

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Koteswar,

      The cooking times refers to the time under pressure and does not include preheating, the time it takes to come to pressure.

      The amount of time preheating takes depends on a couple of factors like the temperature and the amount of food in the inner pot.

      It can take around 10 – 45 minutes to pressurize.

      With that being said, if you feel that it is taking longer. Try the water test below to ensure your unit is pressurizing correctly:
      https://instantpot.com/initial-test-run/

      If you still feel as though your Instant Pot is taking too long to pressurize, please reach out to our Customer Care Team to verify.
      https://support.instantpot.com/

      Reply
    • CW
      CW says:

      30 minutes does seem excessive for heating to the point of sealing. I would check my set up like make sure my valve is clean, make sure the weight is well seated, the gasket firmly set in the wire holder. It sounds like you’ve got a lot of heat escaping before it seals.

      Reply
  12. Kristen Williams
    Kristen Williams says:

    When I cook my white rice in the insta pot it browns on the bottom. How do you keep it from browning? I use the ratio 1:1.

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Kristen,

      To prevent rice from browning slightly there are a few tips you can try:
      – Make sure that you Instant Pot completely seals and there is no steam escaping
      – Increase the amount of liquid used. Rice can use between 1 cup – 1.25 cups of water for 1 cup of rice
      – Add a bit of oil to the inner pot.
      – Use Low pressure

      Let me know if you are still experiencing some browning when cooking rice.

      Reply
  13. jason
    jason says:

    I use an “off brand” electric PCer ;-( But I get TONS of info from you guys!!! The manual suggestions are top!!

    Jay
    Tampa Bay

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Jay,

      Thank you for the wonderful feedback.

      We are happy to hear that you enjoy, and find the information we provide helpful; even though you do not own our Multi-Use Pressure Cookers.

      We would love to be able to help you to the fullest. We have many great sales currently!

      Reply
  14. Ed
    Ed says:

    i just got an instant pot “mini”, and i notice that although the manual says that brown rice must be coocked with the “multigrain” function rather than the “rice” function, it also notes that the mini has no “multigrain” function. so how do I cook brown or other multigrain rice with the mini, or can/should the mini not be used to cook multigrain at all?

    Reply
  15. rdw
    rdw says:

    I used 2 cups of home made bone broth plus 1/2 cup of water because my bone broth is very thick.
    The rice was 1 cup of white Jasmine dry but I soaked it for several hours and rinsed it to decrease the arsenic. Rice Autocook. Natural release plus 20 minutes. Turned out perfect.

    Reply
  16. Steve Timpson
    Steve Timpson says:

    Ok I just bought an 6 quart instant pot. I followed the directions for the brown rice but wanted only to cook 1 cup of rice so I reduced the recommend water in the recipe book from 2 1/2 to 1 1/4. Set the timer for 22 minutes and pressure cook. about 10 minutes into the process it quit as it ran out of water and the rice was not done. I added another 1 1/12 cups water and started again for just 10 minutes. it finished and the rice was slightly under done but good. So this tells me the 2 cups rice with 2 1/2 cups water from the book provided is wrong. it should be 1 cup brown rice and 2 1/2 cups water. What gives?

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Steve,

      The booklet is correct for brown rice, the rice to water ratio is 1 cup of brown rice to 1.25 cups of water. The issue comes from trying to cook only one cup of rice. The minimum water level needed to pressurize is 1.5 cups of water. If you would like to cook only one cup of rice, use the pot-in-pot method.
      First, add 1.5 cups of water in the inner pot
      Then add the trivet (steam rack) to the inner pot
      Using an oven-safe bowl that can fit in the inner pot with space around the sides add 1 cup of rice to 1.25 cups of water.
      Place bowl on top of the trivet
      Put on the lid
      Set timer based on recipe time (22 minutes)
      Also, ensure the steam release is set to seal

      Reply
  17. Mike W.
    Mike W. says:

    I’ve been using the 1:1 water to rice ratio, 3 min high pressure, 10 min natural release method since I got my IP Ultra a few months back, with good results and no problems.

    Recently, however, I started getting the burn error message whenever I try to cook 3 cups of rice or more. I also tried cooking 4 cups using 4.5 cups water, but still got the burn error. I noticed that the pop up valve started releasing steam about 6 min into the preheat cycle and continues for about a minute before popping up. I don’t think it did this before. The loss of moisture is probably the cause of the burn error. Maybe the pressure sensor is faulty, causing the valve to pop up later than it should. I tried the 5 minute, water only test and the same steam release happened, but there was no burn message (since there was nothing in it to burn).

    Wondering if I should just increase the water ratio by trial and error to find what works or to have it serviced under warranty.

    Reply
    • Instant Pot
      Instant Pot says:

      Hi Mike,

      Burn notice happens when the inner pot encounters a heat distribution issue, such as when starch accumulates on the bottom of the inner pot. Try adding a little bit of oil or butter the bottom of the inner pot. Sometimes food particles can build up, make sure to regularly remove the float valve and steam release for cleaning.

      If the above didn’t correct the burn notice, please reach out to our Customer Care Team.
      https://support.instantpot.com/

      Reply
      • Mike W.
        Mike W. says:

        I think I found the problem. I removed the silicone seal that attaches to the pop up valve and found that there was some residue on it which probably interfered with it making a good seal against the inside of the lid. This caused it to leak more steam during preheating and the reduction of moisture inside the pot caused the burn errors. After cleaning the silicone seal, it cooks rice perfectly again.

        Reply
  18. Mary
    Mary says:

    I am a first time instant pot user and the settings seem to be confusing me. I have the instant pot 4th edition and it does not have a manual button. I am cooking a mix of brown and wild rice. Do I use the rice feature and if I do how do I adjust the time? Or do I use the steam button and adjust time to 25 minutes? Or something other than the above? Should pressure level be low or high? Thank you for any help.

    Reply
    • Chris Wrinn
      Chris Wrinn says:

      Hi Mary,

      Recipes may indicate to use the Manual or the Pressure Cook function. These terms are interchangeable. The rice button is only for white and parboiled rice, any other grain will be cooked using the Multigrain or Pressure Cook program. Here is more information on the cooking programs:
      https://instantpot.com/portfolio-item/how-smart-cooking-programs-work/
      For cooking times of specific grains, we have a great cooking timetable for rice and grains.
      https://instantpot.com/instantpot-cooking-time/

      Reply
      • Diane
        Diane says:

        A recipe for a wild rice dish says to use the rice setting and cook for 30 minutes but the rice setting only allows for 12 min. cooking time. In using the manual/pressure cook option and setting the time at 30 minutes, do I need to adjust the pressure to the low setting like it is when using the rice button option?

        Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Diane,

          The rice setting is automatic and cook time can’t be adjusted. You are correct, use the manual/pressure cook preset and low pressure.

          Chris

          Reply
        • Samantha
          Samantha says:

          You can also press the rice setting multiple times and it will go through the “less”, “normal” and “more” settings, which provide more or less time. The most on rice setting is 20 minutes, so still not going to work for the wild rice, but worth knowing. When cooking wild rice, you should use the multigrain setting, which can also be changed using the same method. I believe it will allow you to change the time with the +/- as well. Unfortunately, most recipes and cookbooks were made with the older models and this is the first to not have a manual setting. I am used to using an older model and getting accustomed to the 4th edition has been different.

          Reply
          • Chris Wrinn
            Chris Wrinn says:

            Hi Samantha,

            You are correct the rice program cannot cook wild rice. The rice program is designed to cook only white or parboil rice. The “less”, “normal” and “more” of the rice program is for the finished texture of the rice, for rice with a firmer texture, use the “Less” mode; for rice with a normal texture, use the “Normal” mode; for rice with a softer texture, use the “More” mode.

            The best cooking program for grains that require longer cooking time would be the multigrain program as you stated. For newer models, we just renamed the manual program to be called pressure cook, it functions the exact same way.

            The description of each program can be found here: https://instantpot.com/cooking-program-options/

            Chris

  19. Jacqueline Church
    Jacqueline Church says:

    You cannot cook Japanese rice without rinsing, you give us video and long explanation with rinsing then instruct to cook DRY rice in the final instructions. No way that doesn’t come out sticky. I love my instant pot but your instructions and manuals are SO VERY unhelpful.

    Reply
    • Chris Wrinn
      Chris Wrinn says:

      Hi Jacqueline,

      In the final recipe, it instructs you to measure a cup of dry rice. Step three, instructs you to rinse the rice and add it to the Instant Pot.

      I hope this clears up any confusion.

      Reply
  20. Melissa Beaird
    Melissa Beaird says:

    Question can you cook boxed rice like uncle bens in the instant pot? Like a long grain and wild rice blend. If so how long would you cook it for.

    Reply
      • dave
        dave says:

        I just tried to use Uncle Ben’s converted rice last night. Used a 1:1 ratio of rice to water. I used the rice setting. When it said it was done I opened the lid and it was still pretty hard and a lot of it had stuck to the bottom of the pan. Was not impressed.

        Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Dave,

          Sorry to hear that your rice came out hard.

          To stop the rice from sticking to the bottom, add some oil to the inner pot.

          Was the steam release turned to sealing?

          Typically, if rice is hard after cooking is complete, it needed more water. If the rice was not rinsed or soaked, it will need a bit more water than 1:1. For rice, the amount of water is equally important as cooking time. For firmer rice, use 1 cup of water, or up to 1.5 cups for sticky soft rice.

          Chris Wrinn

          Reply
  21. Marlene High
    Marlene High says:

    I tried this and followed it to the letter. The result was a block of wet, sticky rice. And I do mean sticky. Almost super-glue!

    I made three cups of rice in the IP Duo Plus 80.

    I’m going to try using less water next time, but I would love to know how this could be when everybody says it’s perfect.

    Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Chris Wrinn
      Chris Wrinn says:

      Hi Marlene,

      Thank you for commenting.

      The consistency of the rice is a personal preference.

      If it was too sticky, reduce the amount of water used.

      Another reason can be the type of grain of rice used. Please see our cooking chart, for rice and grains, to ensure the correct cooking times and ratio were used.
      https://instantpot.com/instantpot-cooking-time/

      Reply
      • Karen
        Karen says:

        Good Morning. I have an IP 6 quart. I have never used the rice setting I use manual setting for 9 minutes. The rice setting is more time. Should I be using this? I use long grain. It’s confusing you hear one way and another. Who do you listen too? Thanks

        Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Karen,

          We have multiple models that are 6 Quart, I will try my best to answer your question without knowing the exact model.

          The reason for different recipes for simply rice is due to the versatility of the Instant Pot, personal preference and pressure cooking (contents will still cook while under pressure).

          The rice setting is automatic based on the amount inside the inner pot. It is only designed for white or parboiled rice. The longer cooking time of the Rice program is because it is cooking on low pressure.

          The recipe you listen to is the one that produces your desired results. Our rice program has three different settings, for rice with a firmer texture, use the Less mode; for rice with a normal texture, use the Normal mode; for rice with a softer texture, use the More mode.

          Recipes for rice using the manual or multigrain program give you more ability to use different grains and to adjust a recipe to your desired results as it is fully customizable.

          At first, all the different recipes do seem confusing but after a few uses, you will see it gives you a world of possibilities while cooking.

          My suggestion is to download our app for tried and true Instant Pot recipe:
          https://instantpot.com/instant-pot-recipe-app-free-300-recipes/
          Join our Facebook Community to ask any question you wish:
          https://www.facebook.com/groups/InstantPotCommunity/

          Chris W,

          Reply
  22. Kirk Shultz
    Kirk Shultz says:

    If you live at 8000′ like I do, it changes everything. Water boils here at about 196 degrees and since the humidity is often in the single digits (as low as 3%RH) and the air pressure is so low, evaporation is far greater than sea level.

    Reply
    • Chris Wrinn
      Chris Wrinn says:

      Hi Kirk,

      Thank you for commenting.

      Yes, elevation definitely alters cooking in the Instant Pot. For cooking at 8000 feet, the water to rice ratios remain the same. The only change would be for every 1000 feet over 2000 feet sea level, you would increase cooking time by 5 percent. That would mean you have to increase your cooking times by 30 percent.

      Reply
      • Tricia
        Tricia says:

        I am around 5000 feet. I cooked white rice for three minutes with a natural release. I used a 1:1 ratio. It was super dried out, almost sticking to the bottom of the cooker. I may try increasing water a bit. And I’ll use a different rice brand that I usually use.

        Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Tricia,

          For an elevation of 5000 feet, you will need to increase cooking times by 15 percent. A 3-minute recipe would change to 4 minutes. Increasing the amount of water up to 1.5 cups per 1 cup of rice will produce softer rice. A little bit of cooking oil will help with the sticking.

          Reply
  23. Shanan Vandiver
    Shanan Vandiver says:

    It would have been nice to see that you have to cook at least 2 cups of rice somewhere prominent like the manual or top of this webpage. I found it buried in the comments after my dinner was already cooking. I made 1 and 1/2 cups. The top rice was fine but the bottom was not done and stuck to the pan. I love your product, but the instructions are lacking.

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Shanan,

      Thank you for reaching out and your feedback. I will be passing this onto your Manual and Recipe development team.

      Please do contact us again with any further feedback, it is greatly appreciated.

      Kind Regards,
      Sorley

      Reply
      • Mary
        Mary says:

        I agree…I’m trying to cook brown rice and none of the comments take in that the book says to soak brown rice for 15 minutes and then cook for 4. Do I do that or do I just rinse and cook for 20-22 as come instructions say for brown rice? Extremely confusing. I’ve had two batches of rice not turn out and am about to throw this thing out. I hate it so far. So much easier to just put rice on the stove in a pot. It’s the same amount of time. I just don’t get it but promised my son I would keep trying.

        Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Mary,

          I understand your confusion. The reason they have completely different cooking time is due to the soaking vs not soaking. This would be the same for any dry expandable ingredient like rice, beans, lentils, and other grains. Soaked grains require a shorter cooking time, which depending on what the recipe calls for can produce different cooking times.

          We have our most recent cookbook available online: https://instantpot.com/recipe-booklet/

          Chris W

          Reply
          • j thomas
            j thomas says:

            Hello, your new recipe book (as of Sept 2018) is helpful in correcting the cooking times for brown rice. But I did not see an indication of whether I should cook it using the high pressure setting or the low?

          • Chris Wrinn
            Chris Wrinn says:

            Hi Thomas,

            Thank you, it is feedback like yours that help us improve. For recipes that do not indicate a pressure level, you would use high pressure. A tip: if the recipe requires the use of low pressure it would state it, as it is typically used for delicate food items which would not produce the same results under high pressure.

            Chris W

  24. Radonna Willis
    Radonna Willis says:

    I accidentally bought Trader Joe’s quick cooking brown basmati rice. Cook time is 10 to 12 minutes. How long do you think in Ipot?

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Radonna,

      The rice function on the Instant Pot is designed for pressure cooking uncooked rice. As quick cooking rice is parboiled we recommend following the instructions on the package, please keep in mind these instructions are not intended for pressure cooking.

      If you have questions please feel free to reach out.
      Sorley

      Reply
  25. Ashley
    Ashley says:

    Hi- I have the 8 quart Instantpot and I’m trying to make 8 cups of rice so I would do that with 8 cups of water however would I just hit the rice button since I’m doing so much more ? Or do I have to do it manually and cook it for longer and how would I know how long ?

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Ashley,

      The Rice function is a fully automated smart program for cooking regular rice or parboiled rice. As such, it will automatically calculate the cooking time based upon the volume of rice added.

      If you have any questions please feel free to reach out.
      Sorley

      Reply
      • Kris
        Kris says:

        Sorley O,

        Above you stated that the Instant Pot is for cooking uncooked rice only. Here you state it is for regular or parboiled rice. Can you clarify?

        Thanks!

        Reply
          • Angie S.
            Angie S. says:

            I’m going to take a stab in the dark and say that you cook any other rice other than white and parbroiled rice using the pressure cook option/manual option on your IP?

          • Instant Pot
            Instant Pot says:

            Hi Angie,

            That is correct, other grains have a longer cooking time and would not be fully cooked using the Rice Program. You can cook different types of grains using both the Pressure Cook(Manual) and Multigrain Program if your unit has a Multigrain program.

  26. Tawnya
    Tawnya says:

    Just purchased. An IP i push the rice button and nothing happens Same with cake button. Is it me? Or is it defective?

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Tawnya,

      If your Instant Pot has a detachable cord please ensure it is firmly plugged-in. For further assistance please create a support ticket at the following link, https://support.instantpot.com/. A customer service representative will be in contact within 24-48 hours.

      Kind Regards,

      Sorley

      Reply
    • Jon
      Jon says:

      Tawnya,

      Please make sure your Instant Pot has a power cord attached to it and plugged in. Also make sure it is plugged into the wall. You will hear a beep as soon as you turn on your IP, that will tell you that the device is working. When you have your rice and water in your Instant Pot bowl, close the lid fully on the Instant pot and rotate clockwise. When you press the rice button, you shouldn’t have to do anything. Wait until it’s done.

      Reply
    • Bikracer
      Bikracer says:

      Make sure the power cord is firmly plugged into the pot. It can look attached buy not be, give it a push and see if that solves the problem. It did for me when I had the same problem.

      Reply
  27. Eric Janus
    Eric Janus says:

    Two suggestions:

    1. In your instructions/recipe – please specify what pressure cooking settings to use (you specify time, but not other settings).
    2. In the instruction booklet that came with the IP – you should clarify that the “rice” setting applies only to white rice. That limitation is not at all clear.

    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Eric,

      We would like to thank you for your feedback.

      We will have this feedback passed along to the appropriate parties to consider.

      Kind Regards,
      Sorley

      Reply
  28. Helen Pirtle
    Helen Pirtle says:

    Can you give details on how to do the Pot-in-Pot method of cooking? Do you need to put a cover over the smaller inner pot so it doesn’t absorb more water? I tried cooking steel cut oats in a bowl and it appeared a lot of water dipped into the bowl of oats and water.

    Reply
  29. Ann
    Ann says:

    I thought I wanted the Instant Pot, but wasn’t sure so I bought one for my son and daughter-in-law when their old slow cooker broke. They were delighted so I decided to give it a try. I am probably one of the few people to say this but… I HATE it.

    I’ve been making all kinds of rice for 30 + years and never have I had an issue, along comes Instant Pot and I have gotten nothing but either undercooked or overcooked rice, regardless of the type.

    I then started to look through the online sites for recipes. First, there was barely one that appealed to me. Mostly quick Chinese stuff you throw together or chili or I don’t know what. I decided to try an orange chicken… it was awful… dry and sticky.

    This pot seems to take away all the fun and preparation, the simmering and stirring, sautéing and braising. The smells and aromas of good, wholesome home cooking.

    Now before you all start hating on me I get that it’s meant for the busy person who does not have time to cook. I raised four kids while working full time and part of that as a single mom. I get the need making a quick meal I just can’t see the appeal.

    Reply
    • Sorley O
      Sorley O says:

      Hello Ann,

      Thank you for reaching out and your feedback, it is appreciated. I would be more than pleased to discuss cooking rice, as I wish for you to enjoy your Instant Pot. Please ensure you are using 1 cup of water per 1 cup of white rice.

      Rinse the rice first, and add a little oil to the inner pot. To discuss further please contact our customer support at the following link; https://support.instantpot.com. A customer service representative will be in touch within 72 hours.

      Kind Regards,
      Sorley

      Reply
        • Chris Wrinn
          Chris Wrinn says:

          Hi Sue,

          Thank you for commenting.

          Both water ratios are correct, it is based on preference. Less water produces firmer rice and more water produces stickier.

          Reply
    • Lisa H
      Lisa H says:

      Ann,
      I have found so many great sites. I just got my Instant Pot this week (I have been waiting a few weeks for it to come so I was prepare). While I tested the pot, I streamed green beans, made oatmeal for breakfast, hard boiled eggs which just fall out of their shells and using my pineapple upside down cake recipe and Pressure Luck (check out his site)’s baking (pressure) time, the cake turned out great. Tomorrow I am going to make my garlic sauce pasta with shrimp, asparagus and mushrooms converted to the Instant Pot. One pot cooking, one pot clean up. Don’t be discouraged, have fun with your pot. I will be making rice tomorrow so it’s ready for Friday’s dinner. Write me and let me know how I can help you. I could use an Instant Pot friend to learn with.

      Reply
      • Linda A
        Linda A says:

        Hi Lisa. I just ordered my IP. Won’t be able to start using it till first of August. I too will be learning. I’m interested in the upside down cake. I’m at my son’s and would like to make it for his birthday. They have a Duo. Thank you.

        Reply
    • Scott
      Scott says:

      Let me get this straight…
      You’ve got rice cooking down pat, didn’t care for any of the recipes, enjoyed every part of any other type of cooking and don’t need any extra time BUT you still bought an Instant Pot despite the fact you “just can’t see the appeal”? I don’t think that’s the cooker’s fault. Probably better talk to the decision maker.

      Reply
    • Laura
      Laura says:

      I am an experienced cook and have probably every kitchen device manufactured. My instant pot is my favorite, not because it makes food easy, but it makes food better! Ok, it takes a little time getting used to, but once you understand how it works, it’s amazing. There are so many r cites out there and I also make my own. It gives a new depth to sauces and savory dishes like chili. It makes fabulous easy risotto. It makes easy dishes like steamed vegetables, rice and boiled eggs. If you truly don’t like yours, give it to someone (or send it to me 😀j as I am sure it can find a good home

      Reply
  30. Nichole
    Nichole says:

    I have not been experiencing good results with the InstantPot with white rice. Ive been cooking white rice in a rice cooker for many years, and its always worked great.
    I was using a 1to1 ratio water to rice (Niko Niko) and its been SUPER mushy and inedible the last 3 times. One time I tried cooking it and it was nearly edible. Why does it struggle with it?

    Reply
    • Sorley Oneil
      Sorley Oneil says:

      Hello Nichole,

      I’ll be happy to help. For cooking white rice we recommend a ratio of: 1 & a 1/2 cups of water per 1 cup of white rice, 8 minutes for short-grain and 3 minutes for long-grain white rice. Please use a Natural Release Method, and allow the “Keep Warm” function to operate for 5-10 minutes after cooking. Please see the following link for further information on cooking various grains of rice; https://www.hippressurecooking.com/easy-pressure-cooker-steamed-rice/

      Please let me know if this helps,
      Sorley O

      Reply
    • Todd
      Todd says:

      Hey Nicole…I struggled just like you did with mushy rice. When I found the secret to be was using less water than rice. For example for 2 cups of white rice I would add 1 3/4 cup of water and use the rice setting which is 12 minutes on low pressure and natural release. Another key element to ensuring that your race is not mushy is to thoroughly rinse the excess starch off of the rice prior to cooking it in the instant pot. I hope this helps you with cooking rice in your instant pot.

      Reply
  31. Fran
    Fran says:

    This recipe/process solved a major mystery that I’ve unsuccessfully tried to understand for a number of years.
    Here in Hawaii, our Mcdonalds for many years now, serve “Portuguese Saugage, egg & rice as breakfast menu item.
    This breakfast menu item has been an overwhelming personal favorite as well as the community’s due to it’s long standing on the breakfast menu.
    The one item I could never replicate @home was the rice.
    The rice is the key to the lasting popularity of the plate.
    I’ve cooked rice for 40+ years but could never get the flavor/texture that McDonalds offered.
    Last Christmas my son bought my wife, his Mom an Instant Pot (on wish list).
    BOOM!
    One to one rice/water ratio with rinsed (wet) rice 100% replicated the Mcdonalds rice that I was unsuccessful in replicating for years.
    Now I make my own Portuguese Sausage, egg & rice @home anytime, even for lunch or dinner!

    The reason for my comment is not about McDonalds Portuguese Sausage, egg & rice though.
    As good as it is, I’ve discovered that using The Instant Pot for making the rice used for fried rice is EXCEPTIONAL.
    Simply make the Instant Pot rice, chill (or just allow to not be hot) then use that in your favorite fried rice recipe and be blown away by the results.
    Mahalo Nui Loa Instant Pot!

    Reply
    • Sorley Oneil
      Sorley Oneil says:

      Hello Fran, thank you for sharing your experience! We are always more than pleased to hear how cooking with the Instant Pot allows anyone to achieve their culinary ambitions!

      Please feel free to reach out with any further feedback!

      Kind Regards,
      Sorley

      Reply
      • Fran
        Fran says:

        Aloha Sorley,
        Mahalo for the kind words of encouragement!
        The second to last sentence of my comment omitted a (fried) word that matters.
        If possible could you edit that sentence to read;
        “Simply make the Instant Pot rice, chill (or just allow to not be hot) then use that in your favorite fried rice recipe & be blown away by the results.”

        Reply
  32. Sara
    Sara says:

    Why can’t you adjust the time in the rice program on the Ultra? I’m afraid to use it because I don’t want overcooked rice.

    Reply
  33. superjacque
    superjacque says:

    regular white rices work fine. We keep experimenting with “sticky rice” and something always goes wrong. help, please.

    Reply
      • Sorley Oneil
        Sorley Oneil says:

        Hello SuperJacque and Greg,

        For sticky rice we recommend spraying the bottom of the inner pot with a aerosol cooking oil and thoroughly rinsing the sticky rice to remove excess starch.

        If you find that the cooking result is too watery, please try to adjust the water ratio. With sticky rice it is expected to have a little crusting of the rice at the bottom.

        Hope this helps! Please feel free to reach out with any further questions or concerns!

        Kind Regards,
        Sorley O

        Reply
    • Courtney
      Courtney says:

      @superjacque, I’ve had good luck with sticky rice putting the metal trivet in the bottom of the instant pot, and then putting my rice and water in a metal bowl on the trivet. I add a couple cups of water to the bottom of the instant pot and then do manual on high for 15. Experiment around with this, I can often get decent sticky rice and my instant pot doesn’t get gross.

      Reply
  34. Dennis
    Dennis says:

    How would you recommend cooking rice that is part of another dish?

    Uzbek Plov recipe specifically directs you to prepare a broth of meat, carrots, onions, and spices, and as the last step you cook and steam the rice on top of the broth.

    I assume that “any liquid and moisture in the broth” + “any additional water” must equal “the volume of rice”. Will that be a recommended first step?

    Original methods of “adding 1cm of water above the rice” seem to oversaturate the rice with moisture, creating very mushy sticky rice when the recipe expects fluffy crumbly rice that is not sticky. Presumably because rice is expected to be cooked in a wok, with high evaporation rate.

    Reply
  35. JLPinSeattle
    JLPinSeattle says:

    I’ve looked online for recipes for cooking sushi rice in our instant pot. We have a rice cooker and love the way it cooks the rice but we want to use less counter space. Every recipe I’ve tried has resulted in mushy rice – different amounts of water, different cooking times, same result. The rice isn’t good.

    Japanese short grain sushi rice – can someone please give me a definitive guide? We add the vinegar after it is cooked, I am looking for the water to rice ratio for two cups (any kind of cup, I generally use a standard cup but I can use the one that came with the instant pot if it matters) and the amount of time to have it run, and on what setting.

    I’m still a novice to the IP and appreciate any additional input.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  36. Jane
    Jane says:

    Well, I tried the IP last night for the first time, by cooking rice. I followed the recipe booklet that came with the IP for Jasmine. It was okay. However, I selected Rice as recommended in the booklet. Was I supposed to also select Pressure Cook, as indicated in the vid? The recipe booklet said 4 minutes, so I set my timer. There seems to be no timer unless Pressure Cook is selected. This is an IP Duo, 6 qt. I want to warm up some pre cooked meatballs, but I’ll do it wrong. There seems to be no separation of Pressure Cook and slow Cook. The recipes indicate to put the food in the Pressure Cooker.

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Hi Jane,
      For the rice, there are various ways of successfully cooking rice. You can use the automated “pre-set” Rice button which automatically does it for you, or you can also do it manually as indicated in the Video. Please note that there is a timer for all functions, there is a pre-heating process when the Instant Pot comes to pressure when it’s pre-heating it will not indicate a time as it’s in the process of pre-heating. Yes, you can warm up pre-cooked meatballs, either on “Sauté” or “Pressure Cook”. In terms of time frame, it depends on if it’s frozen and size etc.. Thank you for your feedback regarding our recipes. I will provide feedback to the team. In the meantime, have you checked out our app? It has over 400+ recipes https://recipes.instantpot.com/

      Reply
    • BG
      BG says:

      I warm food up by putting it in a bowl on the stand and make sure you have a cover on the food because the pot will drip liquid into your food. Warmed a plate of thanksgiving dinner in a bowl with a cover and it was just as fresh as just served

      Reply
  37. Tina
    Tina says:

    I’ve been cooking one cup of rice in my 6qt IP and the rice comes out a bit hard (I’ve tried all the rice settings). Hadn’t seen before not to cook less than 2 cups in inner pot so will try pot in pot method. This recipe says 5 minutes however and another one online shows 20 min. Quite a big difference! I believe the rice button is 15 minutes. What is the correct cooking time for one cup of white rice? Thank you

    Reply
  38. JodieC
    JodieC says:

    What about the cooking time and water : rice ratio for Gen ji mai rice? It is brown rice though cooks like white rice. Appreciate your help!

    Reply
  39. Chris
    Chris says:

    what is the point of the small measuring cup that came with the pot…it is less than a cup I am cooking for a crowd 12 adults 5 kids and need perfect rice and need perfect rice…any suggestions on quanity….I have a 6 qt pot

    Reply
  40. Heather
    Heather says:

    I have a pork tenderloin that is already seasoned and I wanted to cook rice with it too. Can I do them both in the instant pot or do I need to do them separately?

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Depending on the rice, it’s possible to cook them together. To cook a pork tenderloin we recommend cooking it for 12 minutes with a natural release, whereas different types of rice may require more or less cooking time. Here’s a helpful time chart to assit you with deciding about how to cook foods together: https://instantpot.com/instantpot-cooking-time/

      Reply
  41. alex
    alex says:

    Hi!
    First time using my IP with poor results.
    I rinsed 1 cup of rice to remove excess starch (I did not rinse until the water rinse clear).
    Then I did 1:1 ratio and 3mins on High. 10 mins wait then release pressure.
    The rice ended up mushy.

    What gives? any idea how to make it perfect next time?

    Thanks!

    Reply
      • Alex
        Alex says:

        Hi, Thanks for your reply.
        My rice is basmati for which 4mins is recommended.
        I did 3.

        Natural release would take even longer than 10mins wait + Quick release, so I wouldn’t expect a better outcome than the mess I ended up with.

        Or is it that I need to use “low pressure” for rice perhaps ?

        Reply
        • mjun
          mjun says:

          Hi Alex,
          I would try the recommended time of 4 minutes, I understand that you did it for one minute less, but 1 minute can change things a lot. The alternative is to use the automated [rice] program, which does everything automatically in terms of pressure and cooking times.

          Reply
  42. Sonal Gaonkar
    Sonal Gaonkar says:

    hi, i recently bought instant pot and tried cooking biryani 3 times using basmati rice with 1:1 ratio. my rice came out to be sticky and was burnt at the bottom all 3 times. please advice.

    Reply
      • Michael
        Michael says:

        Just rinse the rice first until the water runs clear. This will remove excess starch which is causing the rice to cling to each other and to the bottom, where the starch is burning. Add water at 1:1 ratio.

        Reply
  43. Jackie
    Jackie says:

    Hi
    Can you tell me how to cook jasmine rice? The water rice ratio, if I need to soak it first, and the amount of time? Thank you so very much!

    Reply
  44. MaketaC
    MaketaC says:

    Am I doing something wrong if my rice keeps boiling over in this Instant Pot? It has happened twice now. We followed the directions on in the booklet, yet it has boiled over twice now. Is it because I didn’t rinse the rice off first? We are using Jasmin rice. Any tips will be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  45. Joel Rubinstein
    Joel Rubinstein says:

    I just bought a 6 Quart Ultra and tried cooking short grain brown rice, two times. Both times the rice came out tasty, but very sticky. The first time, I rinse the rice and then cooked with a one to one water ratio. I pressure cooked 24 minutes and did a pressure release in 10 minutes. The second time I used a 1-1/4 water to 1 cup rice. I cooked for 20 minutes and pressure release in 10 minutes. Still tasted good but still very sticky. After it sits for a while it’s all stuck together. Can you get fluffy brown rice with the Instant Pot? I am using Lindberg short grain brown rice.

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Try using a medium or long grain brown rice, as short rice styles typically hold on to their starches. Alternatively, try rinsing the rice more thoroughly, or for longer, to remove more of the starches.

      Reply
      • Lynn
        Lynn says:

        My IP Mini manual states that at least 18 fl. oz (2.25 cups) of liquid should be used when pressure cooking but this video says you can pour 1 cup water into the inner pot and only 1/2 into the pot the rice is in that is set on the trivet and inserted into the machine. This is only 12 fl. oz. Is this because the rice is being cooked for such a short amount of time?

        Reply
        • mjun
          mjun says:

          Hi Lynn,
          Thank you for your patience, the Mini should only require a minimum of 1 cup in order to function under pressure. We apologize for the confusion and are working to update our manuals in order to avoid this miscommunication in the future. What you are describing is called “pot-in-pot” method cooking, and should work in your IP!

          Reply
    • Chris
      Chris says:

      How much time for just damn uncle Bens parboiled brown rice??? It is a wasteful misery right now trying to figure out. My manual says it cooks white or brown rice in 2 minutes…..I don’t believe that from literally everything else I’ve read online. So before I ruin round 3 of this rice, what do I do? Rice setting starts at 10mins, though manual says ALL rice is 2mins. I have a 8 in 1 power cooker.

      Reply
    • Bianca Alirez
      Bianca Alirez says:

      I have made long-grain brown rice in 12 minutes every time with 1 cup rice/1 cup water/1 cup broth and it comes out perfect. I can’t imagine cooking it any longer

      Reply
  46. Katherine
    Katherine says:

    The recipe booklet that came with my new Instant Pot Ultra says to soak the rice in water for 15 minutes before straining and cooking. However, I don’t see any references to soaking in the discussions here. Should I soak the rice first, or just rinse and cook?

    Reply
  47. Mike
    Mike says:

    Is there a minimum amount of rice that I can cook in a 6 quart Duo? There are just two of us and I just want to cook 1/2 cup of Uncle Ben’s original rice. The package recommends 1.5 cups of waster. Should I decrease the water to .5 cup?

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Hi Mike,
      Cooking directly in the inner pot, you should not cook less than 2 cups of rice. That said, you can use pot-in-pot method to cook much smaller amounts! Always make sure to have at least 1 cup of liquid in the pot when cooking. Here is the pot-in-pot video instructions – https://youtu.be/clG4MFkdJdQ

      Reply
      • Andrew
        Andrew says:

        In that video it shows un-rinsed rice? I thought it was best to rinse the rice first but if you do how would that effect the amount of water you add to the rice surely it would need less than 1/2 cup of water in the rice bowl?

        Reply
        • Sorley Oneil
          Sorley Oneil says:

          Hello Andrew,

          Even after rinsing the rice, we recommend that you still follow the recipes specified cups of water.

          Kind Regards,
          Sorley

          Reply
  48. Betty
    Betty says:

    When I first used my Instant Pot, I called the help line regarding the measuring cup that comes with the Instant Pot. I was trying to do the water test and was told to use a regular measuring cup, not the cup that came with the IP. That measuring cup should be used only when making rice.

    Reply
  49. Kirit C D
    Kirit C D says:

    Made Pulav yesterday. Saute Cumin seeds first in butter then put in few Cashews and Craneberries and then put 1:1 ratio of Water to Basmati Rice and pressure cook for 6 minutes.
    Enjoy

    Reply
    • Bev in TX
      Bev in TX says:

      You did not give quantities, so I used 1/4 tsp cumin seeds and a handful each of cashews and cranberries per cup of rice. I used coconut oil instead of butter. This was amazingly good! It reminded me of a pilaf that we used to get in a middle eastern restaurant in Houston.

      Reply
  50. Kristy
    Kristy says:

    Perfect, absolutely perfect. I’m a notorious rice murderer. I got it right! Well I used the tool properly and it got the rice right. Seriously this was easy. I added just a bit more than a cup of water to 1 cup of rinsed rice. I sprayed the pot with nonstick spray. Came out of the pot easily and was easy to clean up. Thank you! (I used ye olde white rice, Mahatma)

    Reply
  51. Dean
    Dean says:

    We just bought the 8q model and have tried rice twice. I used 5 cups rice and 5 cups water, set to rice cook and the rice was mush. turned to vent once timer done. opened pot when steam was released. What did I do wrong?

    Reply
  52. Grace
    Grace says:

    Just received an Instant Pot as a gift, and the first thing I cooked was brown rice. 2:2.5 ratio, 22 minutes, 10 minute rest and then release. Perfect. Very pleased!

    Reply
  53. Debra Carr
    Debra Carr says:

    When I put it on the multi grain or pressure cooker timer it only allows me to program in 4 minutes. How do I program 22 minutes without it being on the delayed start? And why does it not count down the four minutes when it is on pressure cooker time in start four minute time? It took 15 minutes to come up to pressure and has now been counting down the for minutes for the last 32 minutes and it is only at 3:22.

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Hi Debra,
      It sounds like you set your pot for 4 hours, not 4 minutes. Please ensure to set the pot to “00:22” for 22 minutes on the timer.

      Reply
  54. Audg
    Audg says:

    Brown jasmine rice came out perfectly with the 1:1 plus wet the rice method at 25 minutes. We’ve never had rice nearly this good with our rice cooker, which I can now give away!!!!

    Reply
    • Bloozman
      Bloozman says:

      @Audg or @mjun, I am assuming that brown jasmine rice that Audg cooked was set to manual at 25 minutes, so high pressure. Did you use the seal method or natural venting method, or what do you recommend mjun, who I believe is the inventor and owner of Instant Pot. Thanks in advance,

      Reply
      • Sorley Oneil
        Sorley Oneil says:

        Hello Bloozman,

        Great question! We recommend always using the natural release (NR) method when cooking expanding foods, such as rice, oats, and beans. This prevents food from discharging or clogging the components of your lid.

        Kind Regards,
        Sorley O

        Reply
        • Bloozman
          Bloozman says:

          @Sorley O: I assume that by natural release, you mean the “venting on” position, opposite of “sealed position”. I followed the guidelines of AUDG and ran it for 25 mins, but did leave the venting on, which was not clear from that comment, and like others in this forum, it ruined the rice at the bottom, crunchy sticky dehydrated rice at the bottom, which ruined the whole batch after I mixed it all together. The first time I made this same kind of rice in Instant Pot, it came out perfect. I think I followed a recipe that last time, which probably recommended the sealed position, which I later discovered most brown rice recipes ask for. That recipe came from a google search from months ago, which no longer comes up in the first three pages of a Google Search. I think venting lets out too much moisture too fast.

          Perhaps “natural release” with a much shorter period of time might have worked, but I think your recommendation is the wrong approach for brown Jasmine rice. This is a standard Trader Joe’s product, and again, last time it came out perfect. I will write back after trying a sealed vent position. I welcome other thoughts and insight.

          Reply
          • Sorley Oneil
            Sorley Oneil says:

            Hello Bloozman, thank you for your quick follow-up!

            Allow me to clarify the Natural Release method as your description is closer to the Quick Release method. To perform a Natural Release, press the Keep Warm/Cancel button so that all of the functions are cancelled and the screen says “Off,” and allow the cooker to cool down naturally until the float valve drops down. We recommend waiting 10 – 20 minutes to let the pressure naturally release before pushing the steam release valve into the “Venting on”, also known as the “Venting”, position.

            Let me know if this helps!

    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Hi Lori,
      There are various ways to cook rice and get great results, either using manual or the automated function. The smart cooking program has advanced microprocessor technology that has been extensively tested for optimal results. You can follow a recipe that instructs using the manual function or the smart cooking program.

      Reply
      • Vivian
        Vivian says:

        That doesn’t really answer the question. If I want to use the rice button, under what circumstances would I select the 8 min option vs the 12min?

        Reply
        • mjun
          mjun says:

          As the [Rice] function is automatic, it will decide how long to cook the rice for based on the volume. Please note that this function is only calibrated for medium- and long-grain white rice. Different types of rice can be cooked on the [Steam] function and the time adjusted depending on the variety of rice.

          Reply
  55. Will
    Will says:

    How long can you leave cooked brown rice in the instant pot before it is no longer edible? Is there a “keep warm” function as with regular rice cookers please?

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      Hi Will,
      There is an automatic “Keep Warm” function that will keep your rice at a safe-to eat-temperature for up to 10 hours. Do not leave rice unheated for longer than 4 hours.

      Reply
  56. Scott
    Scott says:

    I did not have a good result using jasmine rice in my Instant Pot 8 quart. I rinsed 1 cup of rice and put that with 1 cup of chicken broth and ran it on the Rice setting. I opened it after 10 minute rest and the rice was really sticky and difficult to get out of the pan. I was thinking either it wasn’t enough rice for that cooker or the ratio should have been more water, like the 1:1.25 as others have stated.
    Any ideas?

    Reply
  57. jwest
    jwest says:

    I tried to cook chicken and rice together. I rinsed 3 cups of rice then added 4 cups of chicken broth and some frozen chicken on top per a recipe I found. Consistently get the burn error. What’s going wrong and how can I fix it?

    Reply
  58. Linda
    Linda says:

    I am confused about how much rice and water to add. I did the brown rice. I added 2 cups of brown rice and 2.5 cups of water for 22 minutes. I did the Natural Release afterwards was that incorrect as the rice was burnt to the bottom and totally crunchy. Please any assistance is appreciated.

    Reply
    • mjun
      mjun says:

      It looks like your water to grain ratio is spot on (1:1 1/4 rice to water for brown rice), though we recommend a 20 minute cook time! We also recommend allowing the pot a “5-10 minute natural release”. Here are the steps! After cooking countdown has completed, press [Cancel] but allow the pot to sit for an extra 5-10 minutes, then do a quick release of the pressure. Once the float valve is down, open your lid and fluff the rice up! If you’re still experiencing scorching using this method, you can try adding a bit more water to the recipe, or cooking using a “pot-in-pot” method of cooking.
      Here’s a great link for cook times: https://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times/
      And here’s a link to more information on pot-in-pot cooking: https://instantpot3.wordpress.com/2016/06/25/pip/

      Reply
      • Maryla
        Maryla says:

        The Instant Pot Cookbook (that comes with the unit) calls for 22 minutes for brown rice. Did the exact same thing as Linda, per instructions, and the rice came out suuuuper sticky. I pre-rinsed my brown rice, should I have skipped that? Normally, non-rinsed rice makes for mushy rice…

        Reply
  59. Roya Madison
    Roya Madison says:

    Thank you very much for sharing this video. This is very informative and useful for us. I like cooking and making delicious dishes for my family brings me happiness. In modern generation stainless steel cookware is an important part of kitchen appliance of our home. It helps our cooking very easier and super fast.

    Reply
  60. Lorraine
    Lorraine says:

    I actually cook rice with a 1/1.3 ratio. I put about a cup of water in the bottom of my IP and put the rice in a bowl on the rack. Brown rice done in 22 minutes. White i use the rice setting. Either way, perfect every time.

    Reply
  61. anne lee
    anne lee says:

    I have an Instant Pot Duo 8 qt. My first attempt at rice was 1 c rice in bowl on a trivet. I used 1 US cup of water. My rice was not cooked through and it was too wet. How can I get the dry fluffy rice this family prefers? Thank you. P.s. I always wash the rice first–don’t need the starch ! 😉

    Reply
  62. Ellen Fog
    Ellen Fog says:

    I’m new to this so maybe it was beginner’s luck! But I cooked 1:1 short grain rice and pressed the rice button and then I let it rest for 10 min. I got perfect, flaky rice, but I greased the inner pot on the bottom and sides with butter (after reading comments here) and when cooking rice the traditional way I always put a bit of salt and a small piece of butter so it won’t stick. I did that, too making rice (for the first time) with the IP. It turned out great!

    Reply
    • Rita Kohms
      Rita Kohms says:

      Thank you for this, Ellen Fog! My rice came out perfectly this time AND the rice on the bottom didn’t get burned or stuck on the pan.

      Reply
  63. Shayne Salato
    Shayne Salato says:

    Everyone loves what you guys are up too. This kind of clever work and exposure! Keep up the excellent works guys I’ve you guys to blogroll.

    Reply
  64. Sharon
    Sharon says:

    Made brown rice using this method and 23 min pressure and it was too soggy, will try less time next round

    Reply
  65. Carly
    Carly says:

    Okay looking to make cilantro lime rice for coworkers on Monday. I really don’t want to do a test run and make 8 cups of rice ahead of time. I’m going to use Jasmine rice. Can any one help me here? 1:1 ratio? Time and pressure? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Sharon Hetherington
      Sharon Hetherington says:

      I’d love to know the method you used, Carly, and how it turned out. Cilantro Lime Jasmine is our favorite to serve with Mexican food.

      Reply
  66. Lisa
    Lisa says:

    After many years of marriage my husband informed me the other night he LOVES brown rice! I never knew, lol.
    I tried it in recipes in my IP, failed miserably! Tried it on the stove top, after over an hour of cooking from boiling to low it was still crunchy! Told my husband I’m thinking the only way he will be getting brown rice here is with soy sauce added to white rice. Today I googled again and found this recipe!
    It worked perfectly!! No more crunch!! Thank You!!

    Reply
  67. Dave
    Dave says:

    I was raised using the old imperial cup not the American cup I know how frustrating it can be.
    Metric on further confused the matter at least here in Canada. After the war the American influence in recipes overwhelmed much of our printed industry.
    The Designers of the Instant Pot while Canadian market most of the initial product to the US who use the American Cup size.
    Once you get used to the measurement used you should find everything in the recipes dead easy and work in spite of everything.
    I found the Rice setting is where I began as it is fully automated, while it may be true that the water amounts may vary once you have your local differences adjusted (hard water does make a difference)
    You will also find as the manual points out different rice requires different amount of water and or cooking time.
    Those raises on the old fashioned manual Pressure Cooker know all about this.
    From day one I have enjoyed using the Instant Pot as it simplifies my life and minimizes the number of separate appliances.

    Reply
  68. Jill
    Jill says:

    I’ve been playing with adding rice to SOUP or a dish with a lot of sauce, so the tips here have been very helpful. On the stovetop or my rice cooker, using broth or various seasonings liquids cooking the rice adds a ton of great flavor

    Tonight, I thought I’d see if I could do “stir fry” with less standing-in-front-of-the-stove time. started with a pound or so of frozen pork loin, added 1/2 cup each hoisin sauce and roasted pepper “finishing sauce” (sweet-sour-hot). I also added a couple cups of water, some beef bouillon paste, and some soy sauce, then stirred in 1 CUP RICE (converted).

    I pressure cooked this on low (soup button) for 8 minutes, releasing the rest of the pressure after 5. The rice was totally done, but the rest of the dish wasn’t, so I added my peppers and onions, sliced my pork and put it back in, and set the instant pot for another 2 minutes at low pressure.

    Next time, I’ll try 5 minutes at low pressure for anything with uncooked rice in it, then check and do a second cooking step if needed.

    The rice does smell & taste great! And with the amount of liquid I used, there’s plenty of extra sauce, which we like. If you want more of a casserole consistency, I’d use just a little more water than rice.

    Reply
  69. C
    C says:

    Used the instructions above – equal amounts plain white rice, wet, and water. Used the rice setting. Let it come down naturally. Not only was the rice not “perfect” – it was mostly raw. Useless directions.

    Reply
    • SueB
      SueB says:

      Mine was gummy. Next time I will try the extra 1/4 cup water per cup rice (1 1/4) and see if that helps. I just added a little extra water and cooked 2 min in a covered bowl in Micro this time to soften it up. Trying to get away from the micro in future.

      Reply
  70. Michael
    Michael says:

    Had some Uncle Ben’s long-grain parboiled rice and thought I would give it a go. I read a lot of comments and contemplated the listed cooking times in my Instant Pot recipe book versus the stovetop time on the bag. The bag said 20 minutes simmering, then five standing. I figured 12 minutes and 10 minutes resting would do the trick. I put 2 cups water in the pot and added two cups wet rice. It turned out great! Thanks for all the info. I’m new to Instant Pot but after three days I am in love with it!

    Reply
      • Leota
        Leota says:

        I, too, had good results with the measurements and instructions using par-cooked, not instant, long grain rice. I let it steep for 12 instead of 10 minutes and it was a teeny bit mushy, so I fluffed it up, and left it sit with the lid off to allow the extra moisture to steam off. It is a good pot of rice.

        Reply
    • Instant Pot Staff
      Instant Pot Staff says:

      Hi Lynn,

      The Rice program is fully automatic. It adjust pressure cooking time based on the volume of rice/water mixture. So changing the pressure cooking time of the Rice program is not possible.

      You can use the Manual (or Pressure Cook) program to cook brown rice for 20~30 minutes, depending on preferred texture.

      Reply
      • Elliott4th
        Elliott4th says:

        I tried doing it with the manual button for 25 minutes. Rice on the bottom of the pot burned. So disappointed! I used 1:1.

        Reply
        • mjun
          mjun says:

          Hi Elliot, In the instructions it says to press the “Rice” button for white rice, and for other rice do it on manual at 25 minutes. Were you cooking white rice? If so try pressing the “Rice” button.

          Reply
  71. Randy
    Randy says:

    Thank you so much for this informative video. I recently purchased the 8qtr Instant Pot and tried to cook white rice yesterday. 4 cup of rice, and added water to the level 4 mark in the inner pot, and selected rice setting. The pre-program setting was 12min and low pressure, but after IP got to pressure (roughly 11-12min later), the cooking time changed to 22min. Do you know why it changed the cooking time to 22min? When done, the rice was very mussy. after watching your video, Iguess for now I have to use the manual setting with 12min. What about the pressure setting for rice, should I set it to low pressure or high pressure? What the significance of the low and high pressure? Is there a way so that cooked rice not stick to the bottom of the pot? Thanks

    Reply
    • Diane
      Diane says:

      Did you ever get an answer? If not, here are my comments. You were correct in there being a one-to-one ratio for the rice and the water, but adding water to the 4 cup line in the pot after you have already added the rice won’t give you that ratio. The rice already takes up a lot of space, so will want to measure out 4 cups of water using a cup measure and add that amount to the pot. Also, the pot will automatically change cooking time based on the weight of food in the pot. So, if you want it to stop cooking before the time it shows when it gets to pressure, just watch the timer and turn the pot off. So, in your case, you could turn the pot off when the timer counts down to 10 minutes. Also, I have found it is good to let the pot sit idle for 10 minutes before manually releasing the pressure. I get a good pot of rice that way. Hope all this helps!

      Reply
    • Georgia
      Georgia says:

      I noticed that when I measure with a measuring cup it doesn’t reach the same measure on the marked spot in the pot. For instance, I needed 3 cups of water. I measured out 3 cups and it barely went over the 2C marker on the inner pot. Maybe it was just too much water. try measuring with a cup instead of the pot. hopefully that will fix it

      Reply
      • Lisa
        Lisa says:

        The measures on the inside of the pot are not meant to match the same # of cups of water. They’re to show how much water to use with that many scoops of rice. The rice will displace water and cause the water level to rise.

        Reply
    • Busybee1141
      Busybee1141 says:

      This probably is too late, but may help others. The”cup” measure that MATCHES the measuring lnes Inside the pot, is the 180 grams cup that comes with the IP. This measures 3/4 of a cup and matches the lines in the pot. Not knowing this messed up someone’s rice because they used the line for the water but used an actual CUP MEASURE for their rice. Consequently, not enough water. If you prefer a true cup size, use it and also use it for the water. True 1:1 ratio. Personally, I think the IP should have been lined for a true cup size to avoid this confusion.

      Reply
      • Instant Pot Staff
        Instant Pot Staff says:

        Hello Busybee,

        We’ll understand your suggestion regarding the CUP markings on the inner pot. As Instant Pot are being sold in UK/EU as well as US/Canada, the cup size unfortunately are different in the two continent. We’ll add the Liter mark to the inner pot. Nevertheless, the 1:1 water:rice ratio will get the rice cooking right. You then add additional water for softness preference.

        Reply
      • Instant Pot Staff
        Instant Pot Staff says:

        Hi Busybee,

        We understand your suggestion regarding the CUP markings on the inner pot. As Instant Pot are being sold in UK/EU as well as US/Canada, the cup size unfortunately are different in the two continent. We’ll add the Liter mark to the inner pot. Nevertheless, the 1:1 water:rice ratio will get the rice cooking right. You then add additional water for softness preference.

        Reply
      • PATRICIA SADLER
        PATRICIA SADLER says:

        The Instant Pot’s cup measurements are consistent with every brand of rice cooker and other similar appliances on the market. 6oz = 1 cup is not what it’s saying. That would be inconsistent with both Imperial & Metric measurements.
        It means that 6 oz of dry rice is considered, once cooked, equals 1 portion (the standard serving size for 1 person).

        Reply
      • Mike
        Mike says:

        Personally I think that Americans should abandon the use of “cup” measures entirely, and use logical and unambiguous quantities of weights for dry ingredients (metric or pounds and ounces – either is fine) and volumetric for liquids (metric or pints and fluid ounces).

        Reply
        • Mike
          Mike says:

          Sorry – hit the reply button too soon – I meant to also say…

          “As Instant Pot are being sold in UK/EU as well as US/Canada, the cup size unfortunately are different in the two continent”

          Cup measures are NOT used in Europe – they are an entirely North American concept.

          Reply
          • Pyewacket
            Pyewacket says:

            They are an entirely EUROPEAN concept, as they were brought over here when Europeans settled the Americas.

            Cup measures are still used all over the world, but the metric amounts that correspond to such country’s “cups” vary wildly.

        • Jonathan
          Jonathan says:

          I’m an American and completely agree. I love and purposely try to find and use recipes that use weight and volumetric measurements. I find I always have to tweak measurements myself when cups, Tbsp, and tsp are used. It’s also so much easier to halve or double recipes when simple arithmetic can be used for calculations rather than trying to calculate how to properly halve or quarter 2/3 of a cup for example.

          Reply
  72. Mirella
    Mirella says:

    Hi, I use a semi brown rice and I am figuring how to do it in the perfect way. When I’m using the manual program, what type of pressure do I have to choose? The Low or the High (as in the Rice setting)? I didn’t pay attention and the first time I used the Rice program (since the rice wasn’t rinsed.. no wet rice and 1:1 ratio) and it obviously came out not perfectly cooked, so I add half a cup and set on manual low pressure for 1 minute and after 5 minutes I released the pressure. It was really good but I would like to do it in one stand….. so, do You think that 13 minutes on Low pressure with a ratio of 1:1,5 an a release after 5 minutes could be the best or You may have other suggestions? Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  73. Peggy
    Peggy says:

    I was a little nercous about cooking arroz con pollo, Mexican chicken and rice, in the pressure cooker since i knew I would be using different ratios of liquid to rice than on the stovetop. I first browned the chicken strips with oil on the saute setting,then added 3 c white longgrain rice,browned it adding garlic and onion. I then added 4 c of chicken stock and the rest of the seasonings,and set it on Rice setting for 20 min. It came out great! I hope that helps someone. 😀

    Reply
  74. Del
    Del says:

    Is there any type of insert cooking pot that would sit inside the instant pots inner pot so you can cook rice and then cook a meal in the inner pit after removing the rice and said inserted pot to save time and cleaning of the insert between rice and your meal?

    Reply
    • Renee
      Renee says:

      I just saw this thread and Cindy made a comment in December 2015 that applies. In case it doesn’t show on your feed, she said she prefers cooking rice one cup at a time so she puts it in a small stainless steel bowl on the steamer rack. Follows the recommended times and instructions in the post and it works well for every kind of rice. (She does add one cup of water to the large Instant Pot liner bowl as well as the 1:1 ratio of water to rice in her small cooking insert.) Looks like the ideal overall solution to your question as well. I’m trying it right now in a medium sized stainless mixing bowl with brown rice, using the “rice” feature because my curiosity goes overboard, lol. If I get fully cooked rice the first time I will be surprised, but either way, I will still have a clean pot liner and no burned rice.

      Reply
  75. Sandy
    Sandy says:

    May I use boxed rice, such as Near East Long Grain and Wild Rice mixes, in the instant pot? If so, what are the proportions of rice:water?

    Reply
    • Instant Pot Staff
      Instant Pot Staff says:

      Yes, of course.

      Instant Pot cooks in a fully sealed environment. So the Rice:Water ratio is normally 1:1. If you prefer soft rice, add upto 20% more water.

      Reply
    • Instant Pot Staff
      Instant Pot Staff says:

      Yes, of course.

      Instant Pot cooks in a fully sealed environment. So the Rice:Water ratio is normally 1:1. If you prefer soft rice, add upto 20% more water.

      Reply
  76. JC
    JC says:

    Can you cook the rice in a pan ont top of the rack?. In my rice cooker the rice often sticks to the bottom sue to the heat.. Is this a problem with the Instant Pot?

    Reply
  77. Ally
    Ally says:

    I see a lot of good info for times, but nothing on whether to use low or high pressure for brown rice at 22 minutes? I’m guessing low since the rice setting is set to low,but I’m not totally sure.

    Reply
  78. Jenny
    Jenny says:

    So we are in Colorado, high altitude. Is there a change I need to make?? Saw something about your altitude causing some changes.
    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
        • Pyewacket
          Pyewacket says:

          Yes, pretty much. The Ultra has an “altitude” setting that is supposed to automatically adjust the cooking time but I am pretty sure it ONLY does that for the pre-programmed scripts – you still have to do it by hand for custom programs AFIK.

          Reply
      • Sid
        Sid says:

        I live at ~7000′. I’ve been using my Instant Pot for about two weeks, but have had a pressure cooker for years and still use it for many things, but it’s being used less and less with the Instant Pot around. I have always found that under pressure, I didn’t need to compensate for altitude and nowhere near 5% per 1000′ above 2000 (would put me at 25% more time!).

        My theory about altitude is rather specific. If absolute pressure @ sea level is 14.7 psia and at 7000 feet at 11.3 psia (~14% lower), yet at pressure the Instant Pot should be ~6lbs above absolute for the low pressure setting or ~11lbs above absolute for the high pressure setting.

        So if water boils at 241.6dF @ 25.7 psia (sea level on high setting) (using an online calculator)
        and water boils at 233.8dF @ 22.3 psia (7000′ on high setting)
        the difference is only 3% higher temperature @ sea level but 3% pretty much comes out in the wash, so I don’t bother to extend my time when using a pressure cooker or using the instant pot under pressure.

        I DO have to extend the time when NOT using pressure. I boil my pasta about 5% longer than the recipe and when baking (due to the reduced air in a given volume) I have to add leavening and bake longer.

        Reply
  79. Cindy
    Cindy says:

    Thank you for this most informative post. The 1:1 ration works perfectly for every type of rice I cook with (long grain brown, black, white basmati and wild rice). I usually cook just 1 cup of rice at a time and have found that for such small quantities, it is better to cook the rice in a small stainless steel bowl rather than in the Instant Pot’s large inner liner. I place the bowl containing my rinsed rice and water in the 1:1 ratio on a trivet, add 1 cup water to the bottom of the Instant Pot and set the timer as indicated in your guidelines. Works perfectly every time.

    Reply
    • Richard
      Richard says:

      This is an interesting post. I am looking at the Instant Pot for rice and beans. For rice now I use a Bella steamer which cooks rice about the same way. There is water at the bottom which is the source of steam, and I put rice in the bowl above in a 1:1 ratio and steam for 30 minutes for this type of germinated brown rice. I presume in a pressure cooker the cooking time would be about the same as white rice.

      Reply
  80. Theresa
    Theresa says:

    If white rice is to be cooked only 3 – 8 minutes, why does the ‘rice’ button on the cooker result in 12 minutes of cook time? I’m confused about how long is the proper time for plain old long grained white rice.

    Reply
    • Donna
      Donna says:

      The “proper” time would be what gives you the results you prefer, and there are different approaches. If you are happy with a shorter time, then that’s fine, however the “Rice” program is preferred by many.

      Reply
  81. Julia
    Julia says:

    When i was cooking rise lots of steam was coming out. i did set the steam release valve to “sealing” position. what did i do wrong? Rise came out nice and fluffy but it burned a little at the bottom

    Reply
  82. Pamela
    Pamela says:

    Thank you Donna.
    My Husband’s relatives in Minnesota just sent him some wild rice which was grown there.
    I just happened to get my Instant Pot yesterday and have been itching to give it a test drive so now you know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
    • Donna
      Donna says:

      Hi Susan, pressure cooking time as well as water to wet rice ratio should stay constant, though you may notice it will take longer to come to pressure for larger volumes.

      Reply
  83. Karen Christiansen
    Karen Christiansen says:

    Thank you for this great, complete explanation. I followed exactly for my Kokuho rose white rice and it turned out PERFECTLY, first time.

    Reply

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