Posts tagged: Rice Grains

Black Sticky Rice Pudding

By , January 23, 2013

Submitted by Kay G.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole-grain black sticky rice, white sweet rice or glutinous rice (I prefer the black sticky)
  • 2 cups or 1 can, coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbs toasted sesame seeds and/or toasted unsweetened shredded coconut (Optional) Strawberries (or mango slice) and mint leaves (optional)

I usually use 1/2 the ingredients.  More than enough for 4-6 individuals served in custard cups.

Instructions

  1. Measure rice into a bowl and rinse the rice a few times until water clears.  cover with at least 2 inches of water and allow to soak 4 or more hours or overnight.
  2.  Drain the rice and place in a heat proof bowl with room enough for the rice grains to expand about a third more than its uncooked bulk.  Add a small amount of boiling water, just enough to cover the rice.  Place the bowl on the trivet that comes with instant pot with 2-3 inches of water  and steam for 30-40 minutes.  Steaming the rice with a small volume of water will leave the top layer of grains intact, retaining a chewy texture which pops in you mouth like nuts.  If you wish softer rice add more water. All of this can be done on a stove top with a steamer but instant pot has an excellent steaming function leaving your stove top free for other things.(I prefer this method versus pressure cooking the rice so I can get the popping texture I love but you can pressure cook the rice for a more glutinous sticky texture.)
  3. While rice is steaming, make the coconut sauce by heating the coconut milk, sugar and salt together in saucepan.  Stir to dissolve sugar and salt and blend the sauce until smooth.  Keep warm.
  4. When the rice is cooked and still hot out of the steamer, add 1/2 of the sauce or enough to thoroughly coat the rice.  Stir and mix well.  The rice should be wet but not swimming in sauce.  Stand 15-20 min to allow the flavor to be absorbed.  Reserve the remaining sauce for spooning over the rice before serving.  Can be served warm or room temperature.
  5. The flavored rice can be molded into a round mound on serving plate and decorated with sesame seed and/or coconut shreds, sliced strawberries and mint leaves for color.  Or dish into individual serving bowls or custard cups, topped with the reserved sauce, toasted seeds, coconut and mint leaf.

Because of the rich, nutty flavor, black rice is usually eaten by itself and not served with fruits, like white rice often is with mangoes.

What are the Effects of Cooking Rice in a Pressure Cooker

By , September 1, 2012

It’s well known that cooking rice in a pressure cooker reduces cooking time by half.  What about the cooking result? Users told us that rice cooked in Instant Pot is softer, stickier and tasted better.  We want to find out what scientists say about this.  It turns out that there are quite a few scientific research projects on this subject.  The effects of pressure cooking rice, grains and legumes can be summarized on 3 aspects.

1. Texture Change

Cooking under pressure or at higher temperature starch in rice gelatinizes to the maximum degree. This is why pressure cooked rice has a softer and stickier grain texture in comparison to boiled and steamed rice at normal pressure. Under electronic microscope, a grain of rice appears to have more pores when cooked under pressure. Please see the images between magnified 500 and 5000 times. These pores make the rice looks a bit off-white (greyish). Furthermore, tough fibers in brown rice and bran are significantly softer which give the food a better tasting texture.

Rice grain cooked under pressure. Magnified 500 times

Rice grain cooked under pressure. Magnified 500 times

Rice grain cooked at normal pressure. Magnified 500 times

Rice grain cooked at normal pressure. Magnified 500 times

Rice grain cooked under pressure. Magnified 5000 times

Rice grain cooked under pressure. Magnified 5000 times

Rice grain cooked at normal temperature. Magnified 5000 times

Rice grain cooked at normal temperature. Magnified 5000 times

2. Improving Digestibility and Increasing Nutritional Value

Starch gelatinization, a change of structure into a form that resembles gelatin, improves digestibility. Pressure cooking rice, grains and beans produces positive nutritional gain, from the increased digestibility of the macronutrients (protein, fiber and starch) and the increased bioavailability of the essential minerals.

Aflatoxin-producing members of Aspergillus are common and widespread in nature.

Aflatoxin-producing members of Aspergillus are common and widespread in nature.

3. Eliminating Harmful Fungi and Bacteria

Rice, if not stored properly, may carry fungal poisons called aflatoxins, a potent trigger of liver cancer. A survey found that 6% of uncooked rice collected from markets in Seoul contained aflatoxins.  Conventional boiling and steaming rice at under 100°C (212°F) is not sufficient to kill all aflatoxins. Study had shown that pressure cooking at higher than 100°C (212°F) was capable of reducing aflatoxin concentrations to safe levels.

 

Use your pressure cooker for rice cooking.  This will make your rice taste better, more digestible and nutritious, and most importantly carcinogenic aflatoxin free.

 

References

  • Kataria A, Chauhan BM.: “Contents and digestibility of carbohydrates of mung beans (Vigna radiata L.) as affected by domestic processing and cooking”. Plant Foods Human Nutrition . 1988;38(1):51-9.
  • Leelayuthsoontorn P, Thipayarat A.  “Textural and morphological changes of Jasmine rice under various elevated cooking conditions”.  Food Chemistry, 2006, 96(4): 606-613
  • Rashmi S, Urooj A. “Effect of processing on nutritionally important starch fractions in rice varieties”.  International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. Jan. 2003, 54(1):27-36.
  • Sagum, R., Jayashree Arcot. “Effect of domestic processing methods on the starch, non-starch polysaccharides and in vitro starch and protein digestibility of three varieties of rice with varying levels of amylose.” Food Chemistry 2000 Vol. 70 No. 1 pp. 107-111
  • Eating Well: ”What is the Effect of Pressure Cooking on Nutrition?”
  • Science News: “Putting the Pressure on Poisons”