Posts tagged: Browning

The Sautéing/Browning Function of IP-LUX60

By , February 25, 2012

Sautéing is a method of cooking food with a small amount of oil or fat at relatively high heat. Food that is sautéed is browned while preserving its texture, moisture and flavor.  A typical use of sautéing is to brown the meat before pressure cooking.

The new Instant Pot IP-LUX60 is equipped with an advanced sautéing/browning function key.  3 levels of temperature can be chosen with the “Adjust” key for best results.

  • “Normal”: ~160°C (320°F) for regular browning,
  • “More”: ~170°C (338°F) for darker browning,  and
  • “Less”: ~105°C (221°F) for light browning.

The “Sauté” function can also be used to thicken the sauce after pressure cooking, by adding starch or simply evaporating liquid. In fact, it can be used for anything related with a sauce pan, e.g warming a canned soup, reheating porridge, etc.

During sautéing, the lid needs to be opened at all time to avoid pressure building up.  If the lid is closed, the display will show a flashing “Lid”.

The procedure of using “Sauté”.

  • Press the “Sauté” function key.
  • Select a temperature with the “Adjust” key for “Normal”, “More” or “Less”.
  • Sauté Temperature ReachedWhen Instant Pot reaches the given working temperature, it displays “Hot” and you can start sautéing/browning meat.
  • One full “Sauté” session will run for 30 minutes. You can cancel it at any time by pressing the “Cancel/Keep Warm” key and continue with a pressure cooking function.

A brief video demo of Instant Pot IP-LUX60 for browning (sautéing) in action.

BBQ Ribs

By , February 16, 2012

This is a recipe submitted by Sina.

BBQ Rib Feb 16 2 52 44 PM 239x320 BBQ Ribsgot my instant pot today. i just made my first food in it and i’m impressed!!!! i have in 20 minutes tender pork back ribs( after they were finished i put them for 5-10 minutes under the broiler so they got a nice colour!) they taste amazing.

I ALREADY LOVE MY INSTANT POT. falling of the bone ribs after 20 minutes in the instant pot. wow.

i seasoned them with a rib rub and browned them on the “browning” setting first. took them out…. added 1 can of root beer. added the steam rack in the pot,brushed selfmade bbq sauce on the rib pieces,arranged the pork back ribs on the steam rack. closed the lid, used meat setting for 20 minutes. after pressure was gone and all was finished i took the ribs out(very tender!!!!) and just brushed some bbq sauce on them again and put them for 5-10 minutes under a broiler(oven). that’s it. awesome and tender fall of the bone ribs in 30 minutes with the help of the instant pot! thanks for an amazing product.

(shared it on facebook as well)more to come on facebook for sure. :-)

Improved Versatility of Instant Pot Model IP-LUX60/50

By , January 31, 2012

InstantPot IP LUX control pannel 300x280 Improved Versatility of Instant Pot Model IP LUX60/50

InstantPot IP-LUX control pannel

Our users told us that you want more capabilities from Instant Pot, especially the browning and slow cooking.  You may ask how “slow cooking” is compatible with the brand name of “Instant Pot”.

When our design started over 3 years ago, the intent was to create a smart cooking appliance so that cooking process to a user is “instant”, i.e. the press of a button. Of course, being a pressure cooker Instant Pot also speeds up cooking substantially.

To enhance Instant Pot’s versatility in cooking capabilities, we added Sauté/browning with 3 different temperature settings, ranging 105~170° C (221-338°F).  You can use “Adjust” button to choose “Less” for low temperature, “More” for high temperature (close to olive oil smoking point) and “Normal” in between.  Sauté is done with the lid opened. This function can also be used to thicken the sauce after cooking.

Following the same line of reasoning, we added 3 temperature settings for “Slow Cook”, ranging 88-99°C (190-210°F), again adjustable with “Adjust” button.  These correspond to low, normal and high temperature cooking in common slow cookers.

We also extended manual cooking time to 120 minutes to cook tough dry food, e.g. split corns, in one cooking cycle.