Posts tagged: Boil

Evaporation Rate of Pressure Cookers

By , November 16, 2012

Water evaporation 200x300 Evaporation Rate of Pressure CookersLaura Pazzaglia is the creator of the popular HipPressureCooking.com, dedicated to make pressure cooking hip. She is more than a prodigious cook, writer and educator.  Laura has also devised a simple but ingenious benchmark to measure one key aspect of pressure cooker performance.  She calls it evaporation measure. In her own words, this is done as:

“Starting with a “cold cooker” (not heated from a previous test) pour exactly 1000g of water into the liner and pressure cook for 10 minutes, with natural release. Then remove the lid and shake vigorously into the base and pour the contents into a zeroed-out bowl on digital scale. Record the weight of remaining water. “

Dividing the missing water amount over the total gives you evaporation rate.  It’s a straight forward measure of leakage of a pressure cooker, which works for both electric and stove-top pressure cookers, probably for stock pots too.

Why is evaporation rate important?  set 4 hires 250x250 Evaporation Rate of Pressure Cookers In “Modernist Cuisine” (so far the most comprehensive and authentic  book on the art and science of cooking), Nathan Myhrvold states that sealed cooking pots trap most aromatic volatiles which make stocks more flavourful (Volume II, pages 292). We also blogged about the astonishing discovery by Dave Arnold at the International Culinary Center that leaking steam means leaking flavour. Dave Arnold’s experiments showed that not all pressure cookers are equal in preserving flavour in stocks.  Leaky ones do a bad job, sometimes worse than a stock pot.

Hence, the evaporation rate is not just a simple leakage measure but an indicator of the quality of food the pressure cooker prepares.

What did Laura find out?

“Instant Pot only had an average 2% evaporation during ten minutes of pressure cooking (compared to Cuisinart 4% and most stove top pressure cookers 3.5%).”

In comparison, an uncovered pressure cooker at a vigorous boil for the same amount of time and same weight of water and the evaporation rate is 30%. You can read Laura’s meticulous review of the Instant Pot IP-LUX60 here.

Laura has very high standards. Instant Pot didn’t earn a perfect score. She gave IP-LUX60 a “Very Good” rating. We really appreciate Laura straight to-the-point approach and constructive criticism.  These give us something to strive to improve upon in our next model.

 

Speedy Texas Trail Chili

By , September 27, 2012

Submitted by Peter H.SPEEDY TEXAS TRAIL CHILE

Ingredients: 8 servings

  • 2 Tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 large onion, peeled, chopped
  • 1-1/2 pounds ground beef, turkey or chicken
  • 2 Cups favorite Bloody Mary mix (spicy preferred)
  • 2 Cans (14 ounces each) diced tomatoes with green chilies (or 28-ounce can diced tomatoes with juice)
  • 2 Cans (14 ounces each) kidney beans, drained and rinsed well
  • 4 Tablespoons (or more if you like) favorite chili powder, divided
  • 1-1/2 Cups Water

For Serving (optional):

  • Corn chips
  • Shredded cheese
  • Sliced green onions
  • Sour cream

Instructions:

  • In the INSTANT POT pressure cooker pot, heat the oil.
  • Add the onion and saute about 8 minutes until it becomes lightly golden brown.
  • Add the meat and cook until it browns, breaking it up as it cooks.
  • Stir in the Bloody Mary mix and heat on medium-high, stirring and scraping up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan.
  • Add the tomatoes, beans and 2 Tablespoons of the chili powder. Stir well. Bring to just a boil;  add the water.
  • Lock the lid in place and cook on high pressure for 5 minutes.
  • Quick release the steam.  When the pressure valve drops remove the lid tilting it away from your face.
  • Just before serving stir in Tablespoons of the chili powder then let it stand 5 minutes.
  • Ladle into bowls and garnish as desired.  Serve and ENJOY!!