Seafood and Fish

sea food Seafood and FishCooking time for seafood is typically short.  The best result is achieved with the original juice being retained in the food.  Again steaming is the ideal method.  Of course stewing will also work great.

When steaming seafood, you need at least one cup of water (250ml), an ovenproof or steel bowl on a trivet. When seafood or fish are over-cooked, their texture turns tough.  Unless that’s the intended result, you should control the cooking time precisely.  Normally, you’ll need to use the steam release to release the pressure and stop cooking, as soon as the programmed cooking period is over.  An alternative is to take the natural cooling time (7~10 minutes) into consideration.

Please note that the cooking time is pressure keeping time on Instant Pot or other electric pressure cooker operating at 10.2 – 11.6 psi or 70-80 kPa. Cooking times are approximate. Please use them as a guideline only.

 

Pressure Cooking Timetable for Seafood and Fish

Seafood and Fish

Fresh, Cooking Time
(in Minutes)

Frozen, Cooking Time
(in Minutes)

Crab

3 – 4

5 – 6

Fish, whole (trout, snapper, etc.)

5 – 6

7 – 10

Fish fillet,

2 – 3

3 – 4

Fish steak

3 – 4

4 – 6

Lobster

3 – 4

4 – 6

Mussels

2 – 3

4 – 5

Seafood soup or stock

6 – 7

7 – 9

Shrimp or Prawn

1 – 2

2 – 3

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