Category: Art of Cooking

How to Use Instant Pot: Natural Release & Quick Release

By , October 26, 2016

instant-pot-quick-release

Are you a proud new owner of an Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker?

You’re probably excited and overwhelmed with where to start, which button to use, or how to start cooking!

As you’re reading some pressure cooker recipes, you might be confused about:

 

What is a Quick Pressure Release?

What is a Natural Pressure Release?

How about 10-minutes Natural Pressure Release?

 

Quick Pressure Release (QPR or QR) & Natural Pressure Release (NPR or NR) are the 2 methods for releasing pressure in your Instant Pot.

 

When should we use Quick Pressure Release?

Quick Pressure Release is great for quickly stopping the cooking process to prevent overcooking.

Ideal for food such as:

  • Quick-cooking vegetables (e.g Broccoli, Corn on the Cob, Bok Choy)
  • Delicate seafood (e.g Salmon, Crab, Lobster)

When should we use Natural Pressure Release?

Natural Pressure Release is great for keeping your kitchen nice and clean. Since the pressure is gradually released, there is less movement in the Instant Pot. Your stocks and soups come out cleaner and food are more likely to stay intact.

Ideal for food such as:

  • Foamy food, food with large liquid volume or high starch content (e.g Porridge, Congee, Soup)

 

Watch: How To Pressure Release: Natural Release & Quick Release Video

Read More: How To Pressure Release: Natural Release vs. Quick Release

For More Easy Instant Pot Recipes

 

Great Cookbooks for Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker

By , November 23, 2015

mock cover1 225x300 Great Cookbooks for Instant Pot Electric Pressure CookerOne of the most common questions we hear is, “Is there a GREAT cookbook that you can recommend for use with the Instant Pot, or to include when giving an Instant Pot as a gift?”

The answer is “YES! There are several and the list is growing!”

Both those new to pressure cooking, as well as long-time pressure cooking enthusiasts have reported that they find “Hip Pressure Cooking: Fast, Fresh & Flavorful” by author and pressure cooking expert Laura Pazzaglia a particularly useful and fun book, with original, creative recipes based on sound scientific principles. Many in the Instant Pot®Community report reading it cover-to-cover like they would a novel!

I didn’t just flip through this cookbook — I read it (you know, like a book) because it is so full of useful information. And the recipes are really good too.” ~Anna

“I love the pictures! I have got to have pictures to really get my cooking mojo working.” ~ Wendy

What is so UNIQUE about this particular cookbook?

Well, the author is unique! Laura, bought her first pressure cooker after watching a friend make dinner in minutes; she quickly realized that the flavor of pressure cooked food was “like tasting food in high definition!” In 2010 she launched HipPressureCooking.com to share her discoveries, recipes, reviews and tips. Today Laura is considered one of the world’s top pressure cooking experts.

sneak1691 300x169 Great Cookbooks for Instant Pot Electric Pressure CookerMany have appreciated the icons at the top of each recipe that show a visual of what is needed to make it (i.e. a pot and a steamer, a bowl, or just a pot). That’s very helpful depending on your mood, as some days you just may not want to deal with extra bowls and/or steamer basket, so you can dismiss a recipe just by glancing at the list of needed supplies.

…and what to do for halving or doubling a recipe? THIS book tells you!

Plus, things you’ve come to expect from the Hip Pressure Cooking website –  measurements in whole vegetables (one medium carrot instead of 3/4 cups chopped carrot), the least number of ingredients to get the most effect; and,  harnessing the pressure cooker’s merits (speed, heat, evaporation and infusion) to get the most flavor in the least amount of time.

According to Laura, “The goal of the book is to cover everything that is possible to do in a pressure cooker and teach cooks how to port their craft to the pressure cooker with the most chance of success  by sharing all of the knowledge I have gained in 10+ years of pressure cooking.”

AND importantly, and to our point, Laura used the Instant Pot to create and test all of the recipes in this book, so her adaptations of stove-top methods are spot on for Instant Pot users. This is the only book that covers this appliance with new knowledge in a practical and lively manner. Highly recommended.


Read more here:
http://www.hippressurecooking.com/cookbook/

hip book ip 300x225 Great Cookbooks for Instant Pot Electric Pressure CookerLaura says, “Many of my techniques are based on science and experimenting – these little science-based tips are not always spelled out in the book, but they are the reasons my recipes always turn out well.”

For example:

“After watching a roast shrivel-up after pressure cooking, I began to research evaporation. I read a little tidbit about how evaporation happens faster when there is a wider temperature difference (for example between the room and the roasts’ juices). So that’s why I push (slower) natural release method for meats (so the super-heated juice don’t evaporate away). Accelerated evaporation is not all bad, it can be used to the cook’s advantage to accelerate reduction.  My go-to pressure cooker tomato sauce recipe uses the (faster) normal release to quickly evaporate and reduce the sauce with a little bit of help from science!”

“Liquids for building pressure can also come from different sources – including the food itself! Some of the recipes use the vegetables’ or meats’ own juices in addition to a small amount of liquid to reach pressure. Vegetables are 80-95% water so it’s easy to calculate the amount of water if you know the weight of the vegetable. I use that trick in the  Jams & Jellies chapter, too.  But there was no need to calculate the water content in the fruit – many of the recipes there reach pressure with sugar (which is a liquid).”

 

Like another well-known Italian, Laura uses the “Learn the rules so you can break them like an artist” principle. While many warn not to cook dry beans with acidic ingredients, Laura skillfully breaks this rule on occasion, with just the intended results:

“With practice, I was able to figure out that slowing down the cooking time of beans by adding an acidic ingredient (tomatoes, vinegar, wine, lemon, etc.) isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In making one-pots, you may want to slow down the bean’s cooking time so that it can catch-up to the other ingredients.  I use this trick in the ribs & bean salad one-pot recipe (below) where the beans boil in the base providing steam for the ribs above. The BBQ-sauce covered ribs above dribble down fat to flavor the beans and a bit of BBQ sauce to slow down their cooking so that they’re ready (and not falling apart) when the ribs are ready.”

hip bbq ribs 262x300 Great Cookbooks for Instant Pot Electric Pressure CookerHere’s a recipe from the “Hip Pressure Cooking: Fast, Fresh & Flavorful” (St. Martin’s 2014) which illustrates this point:

BBQ Pork Ribs with Spinach-Bean Salad
Although the BBQ in the title refers to the flavor and not the cooking method, the results should fool all but your most observant guests. The slide-under-the-broiler finish gives this dish a scorch that is both beautiful and delicious.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

1 ½ pounds baby back pork ribs
1 cup prepared barbecue sauce
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 yellow onion, cut into large dice
1 ½ cups water
1 cup dried cannellini beans, soaked, rinsed and drained
1 bay leaf
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
6 ounces fresh spinach (about 3 cups; baby spinach is nice)

Cut the ribs apart. Coat them on all sides with most of the barbecue sauce and sprinkle with salt and pepper: set remaining sauce aside. Arrange ribs in a steamer basket; you can stand them somewhat vertically to get them to fit.

Heat the pressure cooker base on medium heat, add the oil, and heat briefly. Stir in the onion and sauté until soft, about 4 minutes. Add water, beans and bay leaf and stir.

Lower the rib-filled steamer basket into the pressure cooker and then close and lock the lid. Cook at high pressure for 20 minutes (stovetop) or 23 to 25 minutes (electric). When the time is up, open the pressure cooker with the 10-minute natural release method.

Set the upturned lid of the cooker on your countertop. Carefully lift the steamer basket out of the cooker and place it on the lid; cover with aluminum foil. Fish out and discard the bay leaf from the beans.

Mix in 1 teaspoon salt, the garlic and spinach. Using a slotted spoon, scoop bean mixture into a large oven-proof casserole (big enough to hold the ribs in one layer) with low sides. Using tongs, arrange ribs on top of beans and brush with remaining barbecue sauce.

To finish the dish, turn on oven broiler. Broil casserole until sauce on the ribs is lightly caramelized, 3 to 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

 

For some behind-the-scenes stories about how the book was written, please see:  http://www.hippressurecooking.com/category/hip-books/

Where is the book available? Some specialty bookstores do stock it, and it is of course available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Hip-Pressure-Cooking-Fresh-Flavorful/dp/1250026377/

 

 

Instant Pot Lasagna Pie

By , November 23, 2015

20151115 171554 e1448306694272 169x300 Instant Pot Lasagna Pie

Submitted by Bibi V.
Note: I used a 6″ springform pan and all ingredients were raw.

Ingredients:
Dry lasagna noodles
Jar pasta sauce
Ricotta cheese
Shredded parmessan cheese
Ground Italian sausage
Fresh mushrooms

Prepare springform pan with olive oil spray or similar.

Break down lasagna noodles to fit bottom one layer. Add layer of ricotta and couple of spoonfulls of pasta sauce.

Break down ground sausage into small pieces and add a layer. Top with shredded cheeses and sliced fresh mushrooms.

Top with lasagna noodles (broken to fit) and begin again, about 3 layers total depending on depth of your pan.

Cover with aluminum foil. Place on trivet in IP with 1.5 cups water. Cook 20 mins on HP. NPR 20 minutes.

Let sit 10 mins before removing sides of pan and serving.

For MORE pictures, and community conversation see Bibi’s original post in the Instant Pot® Community Facebook group.

MOROCCAN SWEET POTATO & LENTIL STEW

By , November 23, 2015

FullSizeRender 17 300x225 MOROCCAN SWEET POTATO & LENTIL STEW

Submitted by Kathryn M.
MOROCCAN SWEET POTATO & LENTIL STEW
(Vegan, WFPB, no oil, corn, or soy)

This exotic and fragrant Moroccan stew is reminiscent of a tagine dish but ready in much less time.

Ingredients:

1 lg onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
Moroccan spice blend (below)
1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1″ cubes
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 c green or brown lentils
1/2 c red lentils
2 cups vegetable broth
1/4 c raisins
1 can diced tomatoes
Diced greens (optional)

Sauté onions for 2-3 minutes, adding broth or water in small amounts as needed so they don’t stick. Add garlic and cook for another minute. Add 1/2 of the spices, sweet potatoes, carrots, celery, and raisins. Cook for another minute or two. Stir in lentils and broth. Cover and set for manual, 10 minutes pressure. Turn off when done and allow pressure to come down naturally.

Once pressure is released, take off lid, press sauté, and stir in tomatoes and the other half of the spices. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring often. Taste and adjust seasonings. Turn off and stir in greens just before serving. Delicious served over quinoa!

*Moroccan Spice Blend

1 t turmeric
1/2 t cinnamon
1 t paprika
1 t cumin
2 t coriander
1/4 t ginger
1/2 t black pepper
Pinch cloves
Pinch chili flakes

* I typically multiply each spice by 4 or more to make a large batch and keep in a sealed glass jar.

NOTE: If you are not following a whole foods plant based eating plan, this recipe can be modified to add salt. I sometimes add Himalayan salt and a pinch of smoked sea salt.

Whole Wheat Fusilli (pasta) and Spinach

By , November 23, 2015

IP PASTA AND SPINACH 300x221 Whole Wheat Fusilli (pasta) and Spinach

Submitted by Vickilynn H.
Whole Wheat Fusilli and Spinach
Servings: 8

Ingredients
1 pound whole wheat fusilli pasta
4 cups frozen chopped spinach, do not thaw
5 cups water
4 minced cloves garlic, more or less to taste
Salt, pepper to taste
4 Tablespoons butter, cut into cubes
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated, plus more for serving

Steps
Place pasta in IP bowl. Add water to cover, about 5 cups. Add garlic and frozen spinach on top.
Manual (HIGH) for 6 minutes.
Quick release pressure (QR).
Open lid, stir and add salt, pepper, butter and Parmesan cheese and stir once more
Place lid back on the IP, close and let pasta sit for 5 minutes.
Top with additional Parmesan cheese

Lentil and Wild Rice Pilaf

By , November 23, 2015

lentil and wild rice 225x300 Lentil and Wild Rice Pilaf

Submitted by Amy T.
Lentil and Wild Rice Pilaf
Prep Time: 5 minutes (plus 30 minute soak)
Pressure Cooker Time: 5 minute saute, 9 minutes at high pressure, natural pressure release
Servings: 4-6 servings

Ingredients:
Rice and lentils: soak the following for 30 minutes before cooking
1/2 cup black or green lentils
1/4 cup brown rice
1/4 cup black/wild rice
Vegetables:
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
1 stalk celery, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, pressed/minced
Spices:
1 Tbsp italian seasoning blend (no-salt added)
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tsp dried coriander
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
2 cups vegetable broth

Pressure Cooker Instructions:
1.) Combine the lentils and rice in a medium bowl and cover with water. Allow to soak for 30 minutes before draining and rinsing thoroughly.
2.) In the pressure cooker, saute the vegetables over high heat for 3-5 minutes, adding small amounts of water as needed to prevent burning.
3.) Drain the lentils and rice, and add them along with the spices, and vegetable broth to the pressure cooker.
4.) Lock the lid in place set on manual high pressure for 9 minutes. Once time is up, allow the pressure to come down naturally.
5.) After the pressure has released, stir the pilaf. If liquid remains, allow the pilaf to sit for 5 more minutes uncovered before serving to absorb more liquid. Serve alongside fresh or steamed vegetables.

Amy’s Notes:
Fennel seeds are one of my new favorite spices, but if that doesn’t float your boat, try adding 1 tsp of your favorite dried herb instead, such as rosemary, thyme, basil, parsley, or oregano. The fennel seeds are not overwhelming, but if even just a tiny bit isn’t your thing, go with something else.

This recipe can be adapted to use just about any type of rice, so if you don’t want to scare of some away with the dark color, try just using all brown rice.

For this recipe, I used homemade vegetable broth, but feel free to use store bought instead. Just make sure to watch for the excess sodium in some store brands.

How to cook perfect rice in an electric pressure cooker

By , September 1, 2015

Stumped as to how to cook perfect rice? Here is the new, definitive guide! Using just a 1-to-1 water-to-rice* ratio, and pressing a button will result in perfectly cooked rice of any variety every time. Easy to remember, easy to do.
*wet rice (read on to discover the scientific details, and how we came to this easy method for cooking perfect rice in the Instant Pot electric multi-cooker!)

~~

Cooking rice can be tricky. A lot depends on personal and cultural preferences, and even if we could all agree on the “perfect rice”, the altitude of your location, the hardness of your water, and the age and dryness of the rice may all play a role in the results obtained.

Of course millions of people have been cooking rice for thousands of years and some “tried-and-true” techniques, as well as some myths have developed.

You may have wondered about the markings in the stainless steel liner in your Instant Pot. One of the features of your multi-functional Instant Pot is a rice cooker. Rice cookers have been very popular for cooking rice for many years. The cup lines come from that heritage, and serve as a rough guide for the amount of water for the number of *cups of rice (the small *cup that came with your Instant Pot).

Still, depending on the volume of rice you cook at any one time, your results may vary. One Instant Pot enthusiast, Deborah K., wrote us to share this account of her success using the Instant Pot to cook traditional Japanese rice (applies to all brands, e.g. Tamaki, Nishiki, Kokuho Rose, etc): 

“The ratio of Rice to Water is 1:1.25 (same as brown rice). I rinsed rice; used rice button on Instant Pot; 10-minute natural pressure release. The rice was perfect – even better than when I use our Japanese electric rice cooker (and verified by my Japanese-born family members who did not realize that my “best rice ever” was cooked in your pressure cooker).”

Another Instant Pot user reported good results with the same ratio when cooking brown rice:

“I cook brown rice for 22 minutes – 1 cups of rice with 1 1/4 cups of water – and that was pretty much the most perfect rice I’ve ever cooked “

So we can be fairly confident that for cooking 1 cup of rice, 1.25 cups of water is a reasonably good amount, but what if you want to cook more rice at one time?

Jill Nussinow, “The Veggie Queen has long advocated a “sliding-scale” of water to rice, in her ever popular pressure cooking cookbook, “The New Fast Food”. She recently revealed in our new Instant Pot® Community” Facebook group how she first became aware of this reality:

“My job was to acquire recipes to use, as well as helping direct the writing of the programs to get the software that would adjust for number of servings to work correctly. This is where the algorithms came in. I learned a lot and have passed it on to many people.”

A recent Cook’s Illustrated video is especially relevant to the Instant Pot – which is incredibly (and verifiably) water/moisture conserving, allowing for very little evaporation.

It turns out that the ideal water-to-rice ratio – in the sealed environment of the Instant Pot – is 1:1, with rinsed (wet) rice.

Different varieties of rice require various cooking times (pressure cooking is much shorter than mentioned in the video), but the water to rice ratio remains constant at 1 to 1, simplifying the “perfecting” process tremendously! Science and technology in the kitchen!

The video offers a good explanation of the physics and math involved in getting consistent and pleasing results when cooking rice. Keep in mind when watching that cooking pots differ as to evaporation rates, and it is worth pointing out that the Instant Pot provides a sealed environment, so evaporation is kept to a minimum, giving the most consistent results. Most cooking instructions assume lots of evaporation over time, so they call for more water along with the longer cooking times of some varieties of rice. Watch the Cook’s Illustrated video (and take notes if you are curious, or a skeptic!).

 

To read LifeHacker’s comments, click here.

After discussing this approach with Flo Lum, favorite Instant Pot video creator, she observed: 

“This is probably why the “Chinese” method actually makes sense now. There are two methods… One uses your full hand: when placed barely on top of the rice, the water should reach a certain point on the top of your hand. And the knuckle method: where you stick your middle finger tip into the water, barely touching the top of the rice, the water should reach the first knuckle. I never understood how it worked but now sort of makes sense. Ancient Chinese secrets.”

Considering all of this, we tested various water to rice ratios, and can confidently recommend this as a convenient starting point in your search for your “perfect rice”:

Cooking rice in the Instant Pot, the 1:1 water to rice ratio method:

  1. Measure dry rice, set aside. (about 1 “cup” minimum recommended, any “cup” you choose)
  2. Measure same amount of water, add to Instant Pot’s inner pot/liner.
  3. Rinse rice, add wet rice to the measured water in the inner pot.
  4. Lock on the lid, and set the steam release valve to “sealing” position.
  5. Select your pressure cooking time.
    ~The “Rice” button is timed for white or parboiled rice only.
    ~For other types of rice, set “Manual” to correct time (by pressing “-” to adjust the cooking time) for the type of rice you are cooking, in the case of brown rice, for example select 22-25 minutes depending on your preferences and any local issues, like high elevation.
    ~See abbreviated timing chart below, or use your preferred pressure cooking time for your variety of rice.
  6. Let the rice rest for about 10 minutes after cooking is finished before releasing any remaining pressure, and serve.

~~

The foundation for this 1:1 recommendation is due to two things being true:
1. The Instant Pot allows very little water evaporation due to Instant Pot’s superior sealing ability.
2. Rice absorbs its volume in water when cooked long enough.

Reviews have been overwhelmingly positive, no more mushy rice, with a few stating the rice was cooked, though a bit too “al dente” for their preferences, (these individuals where happier when using a small amount of additional water). Consider this your starting point, record any adjustments you may make, and soon you will have your personal recipe for perfect rice in the Instant Pot!

Pressure cooking times (in minutes) for some common varieties of rice:

White rice: 3-8

Basmati (white) rice: 4-8

Brown rice (long/short): 22-28

Wild rice mix: 25-30

Electric Pressure Cooker Benefits Infographic

By , June 11, 2014

Pressure cooking expert Laura Pazzaglia made a “Pressure Cooker Benefits” infographic for electric pressure cookers. It’s clear and informative.  Laura also created other infographics.

pressure cooker benefits electric Electric Pressure Cooker Benefits Infographic

What is the iPot made for?

By , January 22, 2014

Instant Pot iPot Smartcooker 274x300 What is the iPot made for?Coming back from CES at Las Vegas, I am very pleased with the overwhelming responses from the media and the public. The Instant Pot iPot was hailed as one of the “Fourteen Hot Products from 2014 CES” and one of “The Weirdest Tech Gadgets at CES 2014”.  Techhive made an on spot video report, CNET has a more detailed review,  Sound and Vision compared the iPot to a connected slow cooker, PurpleClover asked “Exactly How Smart Should Your Home Be?”, TechGlimpse put on a coverage, Homecrux drilled down to more details….

Not all of them get the details right. This is no surprise in exhibition halls crowded with tens of thousands of people and announcements of thousands new products. Some may see iPot being cool because it uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE, Bluetooth Smart or Bluetooth 4.0/4.1) to connect iPhone/iPad to the cooker. Well, that’s not the purpose.  Here, I want to clarify the two design objectives of the iPot.

1. Solving the cooking consistency problem. Have you ever not been frustrated by failing to reproduce a cooking recipe!? The quality of cooked food out of Instant Pot is ultimately the most important thing to users. Cooking consistency is affected by many factors: food materials and their size/volume, cooking time, elevation and cooking process.  A one-size-fit-all program (3 “sizes” in Instant Pot) can only go so far.  To achieve the optimal result, we need a tailor-made cooking program for each recipe.  Once this is done, undercooked short-ribs and beans or burnt oatmeal at the bottom will be history.

2. People want to use Instant Pot in many unique ways. To get a taste of the variety, let’s sample a few.

  • GABA rice 300x266 What is the iPot made for?Making germinated brown rice.  Brown rice sprouts in warm water (38°C or 100°F) in 12~24 hours, producing unique nutty flavor and more complete amino acid. See the picture of germinated brown rice I made on right.
  • Sous vide, Onsen Tamago (hot spring eggs), etc.
  • Pasteurize milk at the lowest temperature (63°C or 145ºF) so all pathogens are killed but none of the good enzymes and nutrients are lost
  • Pressure baking
  • Decrystallize honey in the jar without destroying its health properties
  • Sanitize baby bottles, pacifiers, pump pieces.

There is clearly a long tail of these use scenarios. If we add a button for each of these functions, the control panel will soon look like a keyboard. We’ll have to leverage something with a better user interface.  A smartphone or tablet would spring right into our minds.

If you have any intriguing ways of using Instant Pot, please let us know.  We’ll add them to the iPot.  With iPot, the functionality is limitless.

Evaporation Rate of Pressure Cookers

By , November 16, 2012

Water evaporation 200x300 Evaporation Rate of Pressure CookersLaura Pazzaglia is the creator of the popular HipPressureCooking.com, dedicated to make pressure cooking hip. She is more than a prodigious cook, writer and educator.  Laura has also devised a simple but ingenious benchmark to measure one key aspect of pressure cooker performance.  She calls it evaporation measure. In her own words, this is done as:

“Starting with a “cold cooker” (not heated from a previous test) pour exactly 1000g of water into the liner and pressure cook for 10 minutes, with natural release. Then remove the lid and shake vigorously into the base and pour the contents into a zeroed-out bowl on digital scale. Record the weight of remaining water. “

Dividing the missing water amount over the total gives you evaporation rate.  It’s a straight forward measure of leakage of a pressure cooker, which works for both electric and stove-top pressure cookers, probably for stock pots too.

Why is evaporation rate important?  set 4 hires 250x250 Evaporation Rate of Pressure Cookers In “Modernist Cuisine” (so far the most comprehensive and authentic  book on the art and science of cooking), Nathan Myhrvold states that sealed cooking pots trap most aromatic volatiles which make stocks more flavourful (Volume II, pages 292). We also blogged about the astonishing discovery by Dave Arnold at the International Culinary Center that leaking steam means leaking flavour. Dave Arnold’s experiments showed that not all pressure cookers are equal in preserving flavour in stocks.  Leaky ones do a bad job, sometimes worse than a stock pot.

Hence, the evaporation rate is not just a simple leakage measure but an indicator of the quality of food the pressure cooker prepares.

What did Laura find out?

“Instant Pot only had an average 2% evaporation during ten minutes of pressure cooking (compared to Cuisinart 4% and most stove top pressure cookers 3.5%).”

In comparison, an uncovered pressure cooker at a vigorous boil for the same amount of time and same weight of water and the evaporation rate is 30%. You can read Laura’s meticulous review of the Instant Pot IP-LUX60 here.

Laura has very high standards. Instant Pot didn’t earn a perfect score. She gave IP-LUX60 a “Very Good” rating. We really appreciate Laura straight to-the-point approach and constructive criticism.  These give us something to strive to improve upon in our next model.

 

Leaking Steam Means Leaking Flavour

By , June 21, 2012

In his fascinating blog, Dave Arnold,  Director of Culinary Technology at The International Culinary Center, detailed an amazing discovery in making flavourful soup stocks.

Stove top vs Electric Pressure Cooker 300x121 Leaking Steam Means Leaking FlavourWhat’s the discovery?

“All pressure cookers aren’t created equal. The cooker you use affects flavor.”

Dave and his team of chefs and interns repeatedly tried cooking chicken stocks in two types of pressure cooker and conventional pot, did double blind testing with their eyes closed to factor out the hint of color as an indication to flavour.

To make the long story short, they concluded:

  • Stove-top pressure cookers with a jiggler type regulator  (which makes a continuous chu-chu-chu-chu sound as it operates) make the worst stocks for leaking out flavour in the steam. They are worse than the conventional stock pot.
  • Pressure cookers with spring valve regulator, which allows you to turn down heating to prevent steam leaking, make the most flavourful stocks.

Simply put, escaping steam affects taste.

I’m not sure whether the professional chefs are interested in testing home kitchen oriented Instant Pot.  But I’m rest assured that Instant Pot virtually leaks no steam during operation.  And you don’t need to stand by to turn down the heat.  For most of us, cooking is not a job or profession.

You can find Dave’s blog here: http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/11/22/pressure-cooked-stocks-we-got-schooled/